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So I want to do a certain action 60 % of the time and another action 40% of the time. And sometimes have it doing neither. The best way I can think to do this is through switches and making a bunch of cases. An example is below if this doesn't make any sense to ya'll. My question is, is there a better way? Is there a way to just do Case 0-5 does action 1 all in one statement?

        Random rand = new Random(50);
        switch(rand.nextInt()) 
        {
        case 1:
        {
            do action 1
        } 
        break;

        case 2:
        {
            do action 1
        }
        break;  
        case 3:
        {
            do action 1
        }
        break;  
        case 4:
        {
            do action 1
        }
        break;  
        case 5:
        {
            do action 1
        }
        break;  
        case 6:
        {
            do action 1
        }
        break;  
        case 7:
        {
            do action 2
        }
        break;  
        case 8:
        {
            do action 2
        }
        break;  
        case 9:
        {
            do action 2
        }
        break;  
        case 10:
        {
            do action 2
        }
        break;  
        }
share|improve this question
    
So basically action 1 gets call more often than action 2, and some times neither of them get called. – Joe F Jul 17 '11 at 19:46

Something like this would be much more readable IMO:

if( Math.random() >= probabilityOfDoingNothing ){

    if( Math.random() < 0.6 ){
        action1;
    }else{
        action2;
    }
}

Re. your question about cases, the following is equivalent to your code:

Random rand = new Random(50);
switch(rand.nextInt()) 
{
    case 1:
    case 2:
    case 3:
    case 4:
    case 5:
    case 6:
    {
        do action 1
    }
    break;
    case 7:
    case 8:
    case 9:
    case 10:
    {
        do action 2
    }
    break;  
}
share|improve this answer
Random rand = new Random(50);

int n = rand.nextInt(11);

if(n<=6)
   do action 1
else
   do action 2

You need to use nextInt(n) to generate a number between 0 (inclusive) and n (exclusive). In this case we use 11 which gives us a number between 0 and 10. Anything below 6 (60% chance) we do action 1 otherwise do action 2.

See this for more details on the Random class.

Using a switch statement is only useful if you have a lot of actions you want to perform, where the action performed depends on something. For example a different action is performed based on the current month. Its quicker than writing if-else statements.

share|improve this answer
    
6:5 is hardly a 60:40 split ;) – Voo Jul 17 '11 at 20:28
    
That should have been: int n = rand.nextInt(10); Otherwise you're dealing with 11 values instead of 10. – Arkain Feb 10 '15 at 18:40

If you want same action to happen for multiple cases, then don't put break. For example

case 1:
case 2:
do action 1; break;

In this case, action 1 will happen for both case 1 and 2.

share|improve this answer

All you can do is do not apply break in between like

case 1:
case 2:
case 3:
case 4:
case 5:
do action 1;
break
case 6:
case 7:
do action 2;
break
default : break;

or use if-else if you have range of value ..

share|improve this answer

There are many approaches to "random" behavior. Some are easier to implement than others but these sacrifice the entropy bucket. Random() is an expensive operation. Switch is useful for complicated signalling, but for a binary decision if is what you want:

int signal = (int)(System.currentTimeMillis() % 5);
if(signal==0 || signal == 1){
 doActionTwo();//one third of the time
}else{
 doActionOne();//two thirds of the time
}
share|improve this answer
    
The real question about which implementation comes down to what you are using it for and how important accuracy is to your program. If a high precision of accuracy, and randomness is important, there are other approaches. – mbarnes Jul 17 '11 at 20:04

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