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I have the following file

something in this line  2
something in this line  3
something in this lin 4
something in this line 5
something in this line 6
something in this line 6
something in this line 7


value   text   Read      Write
------------------------------------------------
1        1      82090    62337
2        2      27177    39042
3        3      73       5708
4        4      170      749

Now I need to parse the files and get the lines starting with a number. I am using $_ =~ m/^\d+/. But it doesnt seem to work.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $data = do {local $/; <INFILE>};
my $hash = ();

foreach (split(/\n/, $data)) {
    print "printing $_\n";
    if ($_ =~ m/^\d+/) {
        my @temp = split('[\s\t]+', $_);
        $hash->{$temp[0]}->{read} = $temp[2];
        $hash->{$temp[0]}->{write} = $temp[3];
    }
}
return ($hash);
share|improve this question
    
/[\s\t]/ is redundant. \s includes \t as part of "all whitespace characters." –  Chris Lutz Jul 17 '11 at 21:29
    
@Chris Everything is reduntant, since split splits $_ on (multiple) whitespace if no args are given. –  TLP Jul 17 '11 at 21:58
    
@TLP - True. I just sort of glanced at the code and that happened to stand out to me. –  Chris Lutz Jul 17 '11 at 22:04
    
explain "it doesn't seem to work"; what does it do? –  ysth Jul 17 '11 at 22:46

2 Answers 2

It's hard to say why it "does not work" since I do not know how you check whether it is working. But this is how your code should look.

Use lexical filehandle. Use an array instead of hash (you can mix and match). $_ is used automatically in split and /../. Instead of using complex hash references, just assign an anonymous hash.

my @array;
while (<$infile>) {
    if (/^[0-9]/) {
        my @data = split;
        $array[$data[0]] = { 'read'  => $data[2], 'write' => $data[3] };
    }
}

return \@data;

I don't know why you use return, as that is a keyword for subroutines. A way to see how things went is:

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \@data;
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't repeat the OP mistake of slurping in the file, use a while loop. Also, by default, \d doesn't match [0-9]. It matches any Unicode digit character. So unless you want to match ① (CIRCLED DIGIT ONE), you should use [0-9] or, if you have a version of Perl that is 5.14 or later, you can say /^\d/a. –  Chas. Owens Jul 17 '11 at 22:40
    
Chas. Owens: not necessarily a mistake; could easily be simplification of more complicated code where the lines are in memory for some completely different reason –  ysth Jul 17 '11 at 22:47
    
@Chas 1) Good point, careless mistake. 2) Never heard that one before. perldoc perlre says \d [3] Match a decimal digit character. Where does it say what you claimed? –  TLP Jul 18 '11 at 0:42
    
The latest version of perlre spells it out pretty plainly: "Similarly, all the characters that are decimal digits somewhere in the world will match \d ; this is hundreds, not 10, possible matches. And some of those digits look like some of the 10 ASCII digits, but mean a different number, so a human could easily think a number is a different quantity than it really is." The new perlrecharclass also documents it, the older docs had it as well, but it wasn't prominent. –  Chas. Owens Jul 18 '11 at 3:43
    
@Chas Good to know. However, I have to wonder how big an issue this is. So far, during my years of using it, I've never encountered any problems. –  TLP Jul 18 '11 at 3:57

There is no need to read the entire file into memory only to split it back into lines and iterate over lines. This will make the memory footprint of your program proportional to the size of the entire input file.

On the other hand, reading the file line-by-line will keep that footprint proportional to the size of the longest line, which tends to be much smaller. Reading files line-by-line when you intend to process them line-by-line will make your code simpler as well.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings; use strict;
use YAML;

print Dump process_file(\*DATA);

sub process_file {
    my ($fh) = @_;

    my %hash;

    while ( my $line = <$fh> ) {
        next unless $line =~ /^[0-9]/;
        my ($val, undef, $read, $write) = split ' ', $line;
        @{ $hash{ $val } }{qw( read write )} = ($read, $write);
    }

    return \%hash;
}

__DATA__
something in this line  2
something in this line  3
something in this lin 4
something in this line 5
something in this line 6
something in this line 6
something in this line 7


value   text   Read      Write
------------------------------------------------
1        1      82090    62337
2        2      27177    39042
3        3      73       5708
4        4      170      749
share|improve this answer

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