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I'm writing a piece of software, and I'm under the restriction of not being able to use socket to connect to a java application using a ServerSocket.

I thought I'd try with an URL connection, since it's possible to define which port to connect to

e.g:

127.0.0.1:62666

I have my server app listening for connections and writing the input out to a jTextArea. When connecting to the server (127.0.0.1:62666) through a browser, it outputs:

GET / HTTP/1.1
GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.1

I have another app for connecting to the ServerSocket through an URL connection:

try{
        URL url = new URL("http://127.0.0.1:62666");
        URLConnection connection = url.openConnection();
        connection.setDoOutput(true);
        connection.connect();
        PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(connection.getOutputStream());
        writer.print("Hello");
        System.out.println("should have worked");
        writer.flush();
        writer.close();
    }catch(IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

It prints out the "should have worked" message fyi, but it never writes anything to the jTextArea of the server. The code for the server app looks like this:

try{

        ServerSocket serverSock = new ServerSocket(62666);

        while(doRun){
            Socket sock = serverSock.accept();
            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sock.getInputStream()));
            PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(sock.getOutputStream());

            InfoReader.gui.writeToTextArea(reader.readLine() + " From IP: " + sock.getInetAddress() + "\n");
            writer.println("Testing123");

            writer.close();

            reader.close();

        }
    }catch(IOException e){
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

Note: when connecting through the browser it displays the text "Testing123".

So I'm wondering how to do this the way I'm trying or perhaps read the URL that the ServerSocket was accessed through, so I could access it through a URL while passing it arguments (in the URL).

Hope this makes sense :)

Thanks, Mike.

share|improve this question
    
If you're not allowed to use a socket connection... You realize that every TCP connection, including URLConnection, uses a socket, right? –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 21:06
    
does the server recieve the message? –  gsfd Jul 17 '11 at 21:11
    
@ryan: I realize that. It's hard to explain. Short story: not allowed to instantiate Socket objects directly myself. @john: no it does not. It seems that the server gets "stuck" whenever I run the app that's supposed to connect to it. Whenever I try to connect to the ServerSocket afterwards via a browser, it just keeps on trying to connect. –  Mike Haye Jul 17 '11 at 21:19
    
Mike, did you ever find a way out of this? I'm interested to know what you found out or chose to do. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 19 '11 at 22:11
    
I never found a way that worked using URL. For what I'm doing, I'm not allowed to instantiate socket objects as of yet, so I'm pretty much coming up short.. Thanks for the interest :) –  Mike Haye Jul 22 '11 at 21:49

3 Answers 3

I can't figure out exactly what's up. There's something funny about that OutputStream. Add a

((HttpURLConnection) connection).getResponseCode();

somewhere after connect() and before close(), and you should see something different, if not what you expect.

Perhaps instead of trying to use HTTP as a hack, you should just go full HTTP. Use HTTP from the client like you already are, and set up an embedded HTTP server on the server. There are several to choose from out there that literally take just a few lines to get running: Grizzly, Simple Framework, or Jetty, for instance.

share|improve this answer
    
This outputs: POST / HTTP/1.1 From IP: /127.0.0.1 So, basically POST / HTTP/1.1. (the IP part was added by me). I'm considering making the server application full on HTTP like you say, if it's that easy. I'd rather avoid it though, if this leads anywhere. –  Mike Haye Jul 17 '11 at 22:29
    
@Mike: I haven't found it to lead anywhere. If you put your readLine() into a loop, you'll end up printing out a full HTTP request, but your "Hello" line is mysteriously absent. No matter what I've tried, it seems like anything you write to that OutputStream yourself just disappears. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 22:45

I think this is what you need to do if you want the client to send a message to the server using a URL connection:

public class Client
{
    public Client()
    {
        try
        {
            url = new URL("http://127.0.0.1:62666");
            URLConnection urlConnection = url.openConnection();
            PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(urlConnection.getOutputStream());
            writer.println("Hello World!");
            writer.flush();
            writer.close();
        }catch(Exception e){e.printStackTrace();}
    }
}

Now heres the server:

public class Server implements Runnable
{
    public Server()
    {
        ServerSocket server = new Server(62666);
        client = server.accept();
        new Thread(this).start();  
    }

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            String message;
            BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(client.getInputStream()))
            while((message=reader.readLine())!=null)
            {
                System.out.println("Message from client: "+message);
            }
        }catch(Exception e)
        {
            System.out.println("Client disconnected");
        }
    }
    Socket client;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how this should work :/.. Basically the same that I'm doing, if you look carefully at what I posted. Don't see any major differences. Thanks though. –  Mike Haye Jul 17 '11 at 21:43
    
@Mike Haye if you look carefully you will see at least two major differences. He has omitted doOutput(true) hut there is another. –  EJP Jul 17 '11 at 21:56
    
@EJP: The only differences I see are that this code has several syntax errors and it fails because doOutput is false. It still doesn't work. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 22:11
    
@Ryan Stewart so you missed the print/println difference. –  EJP Jul 17 '11 at 22:15
    
@EJP: I didn't miss it. It doesn't make a difference. Try it. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 22:19
writer.println("Hello");

You're not sending any newline. Also your 'should have worked' trace is in the wrong place. Should be after the flush().

Also you aren't reading the response.

Also the server is only going to display POST ... Or PUT ..., not the line you're sending. So this is never going to work unless you (a) make the server HTTP-conscious or (b) get rid of this insane restriction that you can't use a Socket. Why can't you use a Socket?

EDIT: my version of your code follows:

    static class Server implements Runnable
    {

        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                ServerSocket serverSock = new ServerSocket(62666);
                for (;;)
                {
                    Socket sock = serverSock.accept();
                    System.out.println("From IP: " + sock.getInetAddress());
                    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(sock.getInputStream()));
                    PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(sock.getOutputStream());
                    String line;
                    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
                    {
                        System.out.println("\t:" + line);
                    }
                    writer.println("Testing123");
                    writer.close();
                    reader.close();
                    System.out.println("Server exiting");
                    serverSock.close();
                    break;
                }
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    static class Client implements Runnable
    {

        public void run()
        {
            try
            {
                URL url = new URL("http://127.0.0.1:62666");
                HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection)url.openConnection();
                connection.setDoOutput(true);
//              connection.setRequestMethod("POST");
                connection.connect();
                PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(connection.getOutputStream());
                writer.println("Hello");
                writer.flush();
                System.out.println("flushed");
                int responseCode = connection.getResponseCode();
                writer.close();
                BufferedReader  reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(connection.getInputStream()));
                System.out.println("closed");
                System.out.println("response code="+responseCode);
                String  line;
                while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null)
                    System.out.println("client read "+line);
                reader.close();
                System.out.println("Client exiting");
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    public static void  main(String[] args)
    {
        Thread  t = new Thread(new Server());
        t.setDaemon(true);
        t.start();
        new Client().run();
        System.out.println("Main exiting");
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That was my first thought, too, but it's not the problem. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 22:12
    
@Ryan Stewart there are bigger problems that the println here. That server cannot possibly display that data. –  EJP Jul 17 '11 at 22:16
    
Can you explain why? I'm at a loss. Where is the "Hello" going? –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 22:22
    
@Ryan Stewart because it only read and printed one line, which was the first HTTP header. It needs to read and display until readLine() returns null. NB not just until readLine() returns an empty line: that only indicates the end of the headers. Your "Hello" is next. –  EJP Jul 17 '11 at 23:03
    
Have you actually run the program? In the form posted in the question, it doesn't output anything because it never sends anything. With a couple of changes, you can get it to both send and receive a complete HTTP request, but "Hello" never appears anywhere. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 23:11

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