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I have a basic script to edit config files in ~/.config - it works with the cd lines, but that seems redundant:

dir=$HOME/.config/$1
if [ ! -d "$dir" ]; then :
    else 
    cd "$dir" && 
    for file in * ; do
        case "$file" in
        conf | config | *.cfg | *rc)  $EDITOR "$file" ;;
        *)  :  ;;
        esac
    done
    cd - 1>/dev/null;
fi

Changing it to use the variable "$dir" fails. What am I doing wrong?

dir=$HOME/.config/$1
if [ ! -d "$dir" ]; then :
    else 
    for file in "$dir" ; do
        case "$file" in
        conf | config | *.cfg | *rc)  $EDITOR "$file" ;;
        *)  :  ;;
        esac
    done;
fi
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1  
Why on earth do you write if [ ! -d "$dir" ]; then :; else cd "$dir" ... instead of simply if [ -d "$dir" ]; then cd "$dir" ...? –  glenn jackman Jul 18 '11 at 3:30
    
@glenn thank you: ignorance. Pure and simple. –  Edouard Jul 18 '11 at 4:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can't use just "$dir" because that gives just a single item: the directory. You need $dir/*, but that includes the path as well, so you have to strip that off to compare just the file name:

...
for file in $dir/*; do
    filename=`basename $file`
    case $filename in
    ...
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Thank you - that worked. Is there anything I could read up on to more fully understand this? –  Edouard Jul 17 '11 at 21:52
    
@Edouard: I'm afraid I can't really point you to a great resource. Most of what I know of shell scripting, I've picked up on the fly. I had to do a google search to find the "basename" command because I couldn't remember it :) Basically, the "for" iterates over all the files that come after "in". The $dir/* expands to a list of all the files that are in whatever directory "$dir" is. If $dir is /foo/bar, and that has a file named "baz" in it, then inside the loop, $file will have the value /foo/bar/baz. The basename command will strip off the path and give you "baz". Does that explain it? –  Ryan Stewart Jul 17 '11 at 22:26
    
that is very nice. Thank you. –  Edouard Jul 17 '11 at 23:51

You're not globbing the files inside $dir, merely listing $dir itself. Try $dir/*.

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Precisely! Beat me to it. :-) –  Peter K. Jul 17 '11 at 21:22
    
Thanks: but neither "$dir"/* nor $dir/* work. –  Edouard Jul 17 '11 at 21:23
    
@Edouard: Have you tried ${dir}/*? –  Hello71 Jul 17 '11 at 21:24
    
@Hello71 Yes, and "${dir}"/* - no luck, thanks –  Edouard Jul 17 '11 at 21:49

Your first version does a * on the directory, yielding a list of all the files in the directory. Your second version just has one entry in the list --- the directory itself, not its contents.

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