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I have to read the 12-digit tag number from an RFID reader and print it to console. When I use this program to read the tag I get some weird spacing in between.

E.g. My tag number is 4400E6EF1A57. When I keep scanning this tag, the console window shows the following:

4400E6EF1
A57

4400E
6EF1A57

4400E6EF1A57

4400E6EF1
A57

4400E6EF1A57

4400
E6EF1A57

4
400E6EF1A57

4400E6EF1A
57

4
400E6EF1A57

4400E6EF1A5
7

4400E6EF1A57

4400E6EF1
A57

4400E6EF1A57

4400E
6EF1A57

4400
E6EF1A57

4400E6EF1A57

4400E6EF1A57

4400E6EF 1A57

4400E
6EF1A57

It appears to be that there is a long string of 0's and 1's that gets read in and only a few of those are the actual tag IDs. I don't know in what order I am reading these 0's and 1's.

Here is my code: (Some SQL and JDBC stuff incorporated, can ignore)

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;
import gnu.io.*;
import java.sql.*;


public class trying5 implements Runnable, SerialPortEventListener {
static Enumeration portList;
static CommPortIdentifier portId;

SerialPort serialPort;
InputStream inputStream;
Thread readThread;
Connection con;

public static void main(String[] args) {
    portList = CommPortIdentifier.getPortIdentifiers();
    while (portList.hasMoreElements()) {
        portId = (CommPortIdentifier) portList.nextElement();
        if (portId.getPortType() == CommPortIdentifier.PORT_SERIAL) {
             if (portId.getName().equals("COM3")) {
                trying5 reader = new trying5();

            }
        }
    }
}

public trying5()   {


    try {
        serialPort = (SerialPort) portId.open("trying5Application", 2000);
        }
        catch (PortInUseException e) 

        {
            System.out.println(e);
        }

    try {
        inputStream = serialPort.getInputStream();
        } 
        catch (IOException e) 

        {
            System.out.println(e);
        }

    try {
        serialPort.addEventListener(this);
        } 
        catch (TooManyListenersException e) 

        {
            System.out.println(e);
        }

        serialPort.notifyOnDataAvailable(true);

    try {
        serialPort.setSerialPortParams(9600,
            SerialPort.DATABITS_8,
            SerialPort.STOPBITS_1,
            SerialPort.PARITY_NONE);

        } 

    catch (UnsupportedCommOperationException e) 
        {
            System.out.println(e);
        }

    readThread = new Thread(this);
    readThread.start();

    }

public void run() {
    try {
        Thread.sleep(20000);
        } 
    catch (InterruptedException e) 
        {
            System.out.println(e);
        }
}

public void serialEvent(SerialPortEvent event) {
    switch(event.getEventType()) {
        case SerialPortEvent.BI:
        case SerialPortEvent.OE:
        case SerialPortEvent.FE:
        case SerialPortEvent.PE:
        case SerialPortEvent.CD:
        case SerialPortEvent.CTS:
        case SerialPortEvent.DSR:
        case SerialPortEvent.RI:
        case SerialPortEvent.OUTPUT_BUFFER_EMPTY:   
        break;

        case SerialPortEvent.DATA_AVAILABLE:

        byte[] readBuffer = new byte[20];



        // print to console

        try {
            while (inputStream.available() > 0) {
                int numBytes = inputStream.read(readBuffer);


            }



            String newtuple = new String(readBuffer);



            usercon newcon = new usercon(con, newtuple);

            System.out.print(newtuple + "\n");

        } catch (IOException e) 
        {
            System.out.println(e);
        }
        break;
    }
}
}
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2 Answers 2

The stream gives you what it has, and you add newlines:

System.out.print(newtuple + "\n");

you need a buffer of some sort, like BufferedInputStream.

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See http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/InputStream.html#available() inputstream.available - returns how many bytes you can read without blocking (blocking = waiting for more bytes)

while (inputStream.available() > 0) {
  int numBytes = inputStream.read(readBuffer);
}

At some moment of time you have (for example) 3 bytes in the internal buffer, ready to be read. You read it, check with while() that there is not more ready bytes and you are out of the loop. Than you print the 3 bytes and put '\n' ... That is the cause of your broken ids. You should read up until you fill the buffer of proper size, blocking and waiting when your device/com-port will provide enough bytes.

Use the read(buf,off,len) method

byte[] buf = new byte[12];
int len = is.read(buf,0,buf.length);
if (len != buf.length ) {
    throw new RuntimeException("the stream is closed and i failed to read enough data");
}

It will block internally till the needed amount of bytes read or will return earlier if the input stream will report "i'm done" before the amount is reached.

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried the way you suggested and here is the output: 4400E6EF1A57 4400E6EF1A57 00E6EF1A57 4400E6EF1A57 400E6EF1A57 4400E6EF1A5 0E6EF1A57 4400E6EF1A5 4400E6EF1A57 0E6EF1A57 00E6EF1A57 4400E6EF1A57 Most of the time I can correctly read the 12-digit tag number but sometimes it is missing one or two bytes. How should I fix this problem? –  Howard Jul 18 '11 at 20:19
    
Could you rely on the size of proper rfid and disregard shorter ones? I haven't seen com-port software for years, but as I remember my gps receiver was able to swallow some chars, but generated the data flow continiously - so we tried to parse a block data and in case of error simple skipped that block. btw: Might be other events could be useful for you. Start by System.out.println that they has happened and read the logs might be some event will allways be near the error. –  ya_pulser Jul 20 '11 at 5:44

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