Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm sure I got the title terribly wrong (feel free to make it proper), but the example code would clear the confusion.

I have something to do like this:

    private void a_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {           
        if (abc = "cat")
            return;

        Form1 f = new Form1(abc);
        f.ShowDialog()
    }

    private void b_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (abc = "cat")
            return;

        Form2 f = new Form2(abc);
        f.ShowDialog()
    }

    private void c_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (abc = "cat")
            return;

        Form3 f = new Form3(abc);
        f.ShowDialog()
    }

Now how can I write a single method to show up forms like these by passing the form class itself. Or am I spoiling the very concept of classes and objects? Something like this:

   private void ShowForms(Form F)
   {
       if (abc = "cat")
           return;

       F f = new F(abc);
         f.Showdialog();
   }

and then

    private void a_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ShowForms(Form1); // I cant pass string abc from here..
    }

Thanks. I can live without it, but would be of great help if I can have one.

EDIT: I've slightly modified my example to make my requirement clearer, since the first answer wasnt exactly addressing my issue. Apologies.

EDIT2: My Question is not how to get my program running (that would be too trivial), but how to precisely use a third common function to show up forms by passing form as argument (as described above).

share|improve this question
    
The question would be easier to answer if you explained what you actually want to check in those guards instead of a dummy sample. –  Dan Abramov Jul 17 '11 at 23:08
    
@Dan Abramov, It's the same. No more tweaking in there. I've incorporated all that I need to consider. So I hope answering is easier. –  nawfal Jul 17 '11 at 23:12
    
Then I think Adrian's answer is about the best you can get.. –  Dan Abramov Jul 17 '11 at 23:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could use generics and an interface to accomplish this without vs2010 and .net 2.0.

The interface would be something like

public interface IAbcForm { public string Abc {get;set;} }

because you will need a property or setter method to set your parameter.

The ShowForm method will look like:

private void ShowForm<T>(string parameter) where T:IAbcForm, new
{
    if(parameter == "cat") return;

    var form = new T();
    form.Abc = parameter;
    form.ShowDialog();
}

Usage would be:

ShowForm<Form1>("abc");
ShowForm<Form2>("abc");
ShowForm<Form3>("abc");

Your forms will have to implement the interface:

public class Form1 : Form, IAbcForm
{
    // use backing field when .net 2.0 does not support auto properties
    public string Abc { get;set; }

    public Form1() {}

    // I think your current constructor looks something like this:
    public Form1(string abc) { Abc = abc; }
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Gimme sometime to test this. –  nawfal Jul 18 '11 at 0:48
1  
brilliant! I am going to favourite this since its one of my fav C# trick. thanks for helping me learn something new. And sorry for being late :) –  nawfal Jul 9 '12 at 20:26

There is a way to do this, but it is made harder because it looks like you are using C# v2 (from the tag on the question).

Change your ShowForms method to accept an instance of a Func that can create an instance of a Form with a supplied parameter:

private void ShowForms(Func<string, Form> formCreator)
{
    if (abc == "cat")
    {
        return;
    }

    Form form = formCreator(abc);
    form.ShowDialog();
}

You can then call it passing in an instance of a Func that will be used to create each individual form instance:

private void a_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    ShowForms(p => new Form1(p));
}

private void b_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    ShowForms(p => new Form2(p));
}

Because you are using C# v2, you will also need to declare the Func definition:

public delegate TResult Func<TParameter, TResult>(TParameter parameter);

If you can use a later version of C#, you will not need to declare this last part. You will however need to compile this using a later version of the compiler (VS2010 should be fine) - it is making use of the fact that the later version of the compiler understands the lamda syntax.

The benefit of doing it this way instead of just creating the form and passing it in (e.g. ShowForms(new Form1(abc));) is that the form will only be created if you need to do something with it.

share|improve this answer
    
this wouldnt work in my case. I have something to check from ShowForms(). Let me edit my question –  nawfal Jul 17 '11 at 22:48
    
@nawfal: I've updated my answer to reflect the change in your question. –  adrianbanks Jul 17 '11 at 23:11
    
Thanks Adrian. Let me see to that. –  nawfal Jul 17 '11 at 23:20
    
I'm using Visual Studio 2005. Any workarounds for that? –  nawfal Jul 17 '11 at 23:29
    
@nawfal: Yes. You have to use the delegate syntax instead of lambdas: ShowForms(delegate(string p) {return new Form1(p);}); –  adrianbanks Jul 18 '11 at 10:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.