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How do you iterate through every file/directory recursively in standard C++?

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1  
Not standard C++: pocoproject.org/docs/Poco.DirectoryIterator.html –  Agnel Kurian Jun 1 '10 at 7:01

12 Answers 12

up vote 65 down vote accepted

In standard C++, technically there is no way to do this since standard C++ has no conception of directories. If you want to expand your net a little bit, you might like to look at using Boost.FileSystem. This has been accepted for inclusion in TR2, so this gives you the best chance of keeping your implementation as close as possible to the standard.

An example, taken straight from the website:

bool find_file( const path & dir_path,         // in this directory,
                const std::string & file_name, // search for this name,
                path & path_found )            // placing path here if found
{
  if ( !exists( dir_path ) ) return false;
  directory_iterator end_itr; // default construction yields past-the-end
  for ( directory_iterator itr( dir_path );
        itr != end_itr;
        ++itr )
  {
    if ( is_directory(itr->status()) )
    {
      if ( find_file( itr->path(), file_name, path_found ) ) return true;
    }
    else if ( itr->leaf() == file_name ) // see below
    {
      path_found = itr->path();
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
}
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4  
C++ has no concept of files? What about std::fstream? Or fopen? –  Kevin Sep 15 '08 at 22:03
24  
files, not directories –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 17 '09 at 9:12
20  
Update with regard to latest boost version: In case anyone stumbles across this answer, the latest boost includes a convenience class boost::recursive_directory_iterator so writing the above loop with explicit recursive call is no longer necessary. Link: boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/filesystem/v3/doc/… –  JasDev Jun 5 '11 at 19:51
    
You should probably replace itr->leaf() with itr->path().leaf() ('leaf' : is not a member of 'boost::filesystem::directory_entry') –  kFk Aug 3 '12 at 13:46
4  
VC++11 comes with much the same functionality in the <filesystem> header under the std::tr2::sys namespace. –  mheyman Aug 30 '13 at 12:27

If using the Win32 API you can use the FindFirstFile and FindNextFile functions.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa365200(VS.85).aspx

For recursive traversal of directories you must inspect each WIN32_FIND_DATA.dwFileAttributes to check if the FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY bit is set. If the bit is set then you can recursively call the function with that directory. Alternatively you can use a stack for providing the same effect of a recursive call but avoiding stack overflow for very long path trees.

#include <windows.h>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <stack>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

bool ListFiles(wstring path, wstring mask, vector<wstring>& files) {
    HANDLE hFind = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    WIN32_FIND_DATA ffd;
    wstring spec;
    stack<wstring> directories;

    directories.push(path);
    files.clear();

    while (!directories.empty()) {
        path = directories.top();
        spec = path + L"\\" + mask;
        directories.pop();

        hFind = FindFirstFile(spec.c_str(), &ffd);
        if (hFind == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)  {
            return false;
        } 

        do {
            if (wcscmp(ffd.cFileName, L".") != 0 && 
                wcscmp(ffd.cFileName, L"..") != 0) {
                if (ffd.dwFileAttributes & FILE_ATTRIBUTE_DIRECTORY) {
                    directories.push(path + L"\\" + ffd.cFileName);
                }
                else {
                    files.push_back(path + L"\\" + ffd.cFileName);
                }
            }
        } while (FindNextFile(hFind, &ffd) != 0);

        if (GetLastError() != ERROR_NO_MORE_FILES) {
            FindClose(hFind);
            return false;
        }

        FindClose(hFind);
        hFind = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    }

    return true;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    vector<wstring> files;

    if (ListFiles(L"F:\\cvsrepos", L"*", files)) {
        for (vector<wstring>::iterator it = files.begin(); 
             it != files.end(); 
             ++it) {
            wcout << it->c_str() << endl;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
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7  
how long did it take you to write that? I think it would take less time to glue C++ to python and do it in one line. –  Dustin Getz Oct 24 '08 at 14:00
    
This is a nice, non-recursive solution (which is sometimes handy!). –  jm. Jun 9 '09 at 20:43
1  
Btw, if anyone wants to edit the program slightly to accept a command-line parameter argv[1] for the path instead of a hardcoded one ("F:\\cvsrepos"), the signature for main(int, char) would change to wmain(int, wchar_t) like this: int wmain(int argc, wchar_t *argv[]) –  JasDev Jun 2 '11 at 10:18
    
Thanks, but this function does not work with Cyrilic. Is there any way to make it work with Cyrilic characters like - б, в, г etc ? –  unresolved_external Aug 1 '12 at 19:29

A fast solution is using C's Dirent.h library.

Working code fragment from Wikipedia:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <dirent.h>

int listdir(const char *path) {
    struct dirent *entry;
    DIR *dp;

    dp = opendir(path);
    if (dp == NULL) {
        perror("opendir: Path does not exist or could not be read.");
        return -1;
    }

    while ((entry = readdir(dp)))
        puts(entry->d_name);

    closedir(dp);
    return 0;
}
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In addition to the above mentioned boost::filesystem you may want to examine wxWidgets::wxDir and Qt::QDir.

Both wxWidgets and Qt are open source, cross platform C++ frameworks.

wxDir provides a flexible way to traverse files recursively using Traverse() or a simpler GetAllFiles() function. As well you can implement the traversal with GetFirst() and GetNext() functions (I assume that Traverse() and GetAllFiles() are wrappers that eventually use GetFirst() and GetNext() functions).

QDir provides access to directory structures and their contents. There are several ways to traverse directories with QDir. You can iterate over the directory contents (including sub-directories) with QDirIterator that was instantiated with QDirIterator::Subdirectories flag. Another way is to use QDir's GetEntryList() function and implement a recursive traversal.

Here is sample code (taken from here # Example 8-5) that shows how to iterate over all sub directories.

#include <qapplication.h>
#include <qdir.h>
#include <iostream>

int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    QApplication a( argc, argv );
    QDir currentDir = QDir::current();

    currentDir.setFilter( QDir::Dirs );
    QStringList entries = currentDir.entryList();
    for( QStringList::ConstIterator entry=entries.begin(); entry!=entries.end(); ++entry) 
    {
         std::cout << *entry << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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Doxygen uses QT as its OS compatibility layer. The core tools doesn't use a GUI at all just the directory stuff (and others compenents). –  deft_code Jul 9 '10 at 6:39

You may want to examine boost.filesystem

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_31_0/libs/filesystem/doc/index.htm

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You can make it even simpler with the new C++11 range based for and Boost:

#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>

using namespace boost::filesystem;    
struct recursive_directory_range
{
    typedef recursive_directory_iterator iterator;
    recursive_directory_range(path p) : p_(p) {}

    iterator begin() { return recursive_directory_iterator(p_); }
    iterator end() { return recursive_directory_iterator(); }

    path p_;
};

for (auto it : recursive_directory_range(dir_path))
{
    std::cout << it << std::endl;
}
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You need to call OS-specific functions for filesystem traversal, like open() and readdir(). The C standard does not specify any filesystem-related functions.

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What about C++? Are there any such functions in iostream? –  Aaron Maenpaa Sep 15 '08 at 21:43
2  
Only for files. There aren't any kind of "show me all the files in a directory" functions. –  1800 INFORMATION Sep 15 '08 at 21:46
1  
@1800: Directories are files. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 18 '11 at 18:01

You don't. Standard C++ doesn't expose to concept of a directory. Specifically it doesn't give any way to list all the files in a directory.

A horrible hack would be to use system() calls and to parse the results. The most reasonable solution would be to use some kind of cross-platform library such as Qt or even POSIX.

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You don't. The C++ standard has no concept of directories. It is up to the implementation to turn a string into a file handle. The contents of that string and what it maps to is OS dependent. Keep in mind that C++ can be used to write that OS, so it gets used at a level where asking how to iterate through a directory is not yet defined (because you are writing the directory management code).

Look at your OS API documentation for how to do this. If you need to be portable, you will have to have a bunch of #ifdefs for various OSes.

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You can use ftw(3) or nftw(3) to walk a filesystem hierarchy in C or C++ on POSIX systems.

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Boost::filesystem provides recursive_directory_iterator, which is quite convenient for this task:

#include "boost/filesystem.hpp"
#include <iostream>

boost::filesystem::recursive_directory_iterator end;
for (it("./"); it != end; ++it) {
    std::cout << *it << std::endl;                                    
}
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If you are on Windows, you can use the FindFirstFile together with FindNextFile API. You can use FindFileData.dwFileAttributes to check if a given path is a file or a directory. If it's a directory, you can recursively repeat the algorithm.

Here, I have put together some code that lists all the files on a Windows machine.

http://dreams-soft.com/projects/traverse-directory

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