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I have discovered a disturbing inconsistency between std::string and string literals in C++0x:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    int i = 0;
    for (auto e : "hello")
        ++i;
    std::cout << "Number of elements: " << i << '\n';

    i = 0;
    for (auto e : std::string("hello"))
        ++i;
    std::cout << "Number of elements: " << i << '\n';

    return 0;
}

The output is:

Number of elements: 6
Number of elements: 5

I understand the mechanics of why this is happening: the string literal is really an array of characters that includes the null character, and when the range-based for loop calls std::end() on the character array, it gets a pointer past the end of the array; since the null character is part of the array, it thus gets a pointer past the null character.

However, I think this is very undesirable: surely std::string and string literals should behave the same when it comes to properties as basic as their length?

Is there a way to resolve this inconsistency? For example, can std::begin() and std::end() be overloaded for character arrays so that the range they delimit does not include the terminating null character? If so, why was this not done?

EDIT: To justify my indignation a bit more to those who have said that I'm just suffering the consequences of using C-style strings which are a "legacy feature", consider code like the following:

template <typename Range>
void f(Range&& r)
{
    for (auto e : r)
    {
        ...
    }
}

Would you expect f("hello") and f(std::string("hello")) to do something different?

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5  
Is this a real question? It reads more like a personal opinion about what the standard should be instead of what it is. –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 18 '11 at 20:33
    
Based on some of the answers and comments, I'm now wondering if the people in charge of determining the features for future versions of C++ have considered adding new string literal syntax for std::string strings. I mean, Objective-C and C# both use @"" to indicate a non-C-style string literal, and even in C and C++ you have the L"" syntax to indicate wide-character string literals. (And it seems L'' can be used to indicate literal wchars?) –  JAB Jul 18 '11 at 20:34
    
@JAB: and what is exactly so wrong with string literal that would warrant yet another built-in type? –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 18 '11 at 20:39
    
@Gene: Why did C implement a boolean type when integer types served the purpose perfectly well? –  JAB Jul 18 '11 at 20:46
1  
@JAB: In C++0x you'll be able to create a new string literal syntax for std::string via user-defined literals. –  HighCommander4 Jul 19 '11 at 4:00

6 Answers 6

If we overloaded std::begin() and std::end() for const char arrays to return one less than the size of the array, then the following code would output 4 instead of the expected 5:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    const char s[5] = {'h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o'};
    int i = 0;
    for (auto e : s)
        ++i;
    std::cout << "Number of elements: " << i << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Perhaps there is a way to tell apart character arrays defined as a string literal from character arrays defined normally? We would only want to overload for the former. –  HighCommander4 Jul 17 '11 at 23:44
1  
I don't know of a way to do that in the library. You would have to make a language change, and that change would break code. Narrow string literals are defined to be an array of n const char, where n is the number of characters plus one for the terminating null. –  Howard Hinnant Jul 18 '11 at 0:36
9  
Any solution would need to address what to do with const char s[6] = {'h', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', '\0'};. I'm siding with Howard here, C++ programmers should know that sizeof("Hello")==6 –  MSalters Jul 18 '11 at 8:19
2  
@HighCommander4: I used sizeof("Hello")==6 as a quick way to write that in C as well as C++, string literals are constant char arrays with length N+1, including a terminating \0. Compilers need not, and probably do not distinguish between the two, by the time they're doing argument overloading. That means you would force a major compiler redesign for a minor feature. –  MSalters Jul 19 '11 at 7:51
2  
I just realized it's worse than that. One translation unit could define char const s[6]="Hello"; and another could call end(s)-begin(s). That means that the difference betwene string literals and string arrys would require an ABI change. Sorry, that's just not going to happen. –  MSalters Jul 19 '11 at 8:43

That you get 6 in the first case is an abstraction leak that couldn't be avoided in C. std::string "fixes" that. For compatibility, the behaviour of C-style string literals does not change in C++.

For example, can std::begin() and std::end() be overloaded for character arrays so that the range they delimit does not include the terminating null character? If so, why was this not done?

Assuming access through a pointer (as opposed to char[N]), only by embedding a variable inside the string containing the number of characters, so that seeking for NULL isn't required any more. Oops! That's std::string.

The way to "resolve the inconsistency" is not to use legacy features at all.

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5  
"not to use legacy features at all." Not using string literals seems like a hard task (and having to remember string literals are a "legacy" feature may be a hard task as well). –  Suma Jul 18 '11 at 19:45
    
@Suma: Well, I'm talking about passing char const* or char[N] around. String literals themselves are of course still perfectly reasonable. Admittedly, it is string literals that the OP used in his question; I guess the for (auto c : "literal") is a bit of a tricky one. Regardless, std::string is the "fix" for the behaviour that the OP doesn't like. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 18 '11 at 21:01
    
@Tomalak: Please see my edit to the question. –  HighCommander4 Jul 19 '11 at 4:24

However, I think this is very undesirable: surely std::string and string literals should behave the same when it comes to properties as basic as their length?

String literals by definition have a (hidden) null character at the end of the string. Std::strings do not. Because std::strings have a length, that null character is a bit superfluous. The standard section on the string library explicitly allows non-null terminated strings.

Edit
I don't think I've ever given a more controversial answer in the sense of a huge amount of upvotes and a huge amount of downvotes.

The auto iterator when applied to a C-style array iterates over each element of the array. The determination of the range is made at compile-time, not run time. This is ill-formed, for instance:

char * str;
for (auto c : str) {
   do_something_with (c);
}

Some people use arrays of type char to hold arbitrary data. Yes, it is an old-style C way of thinking, and perhaps they should have used a C++-style std::array, but the construct is quite valid and quite useful. Those people would be rather upset if their auto iterator over a char buffer[1024]; stopped at element 15 just because that element happens to have the same value as the null character. An auto iterator over a Type buffer[1024]; will run all the way to the end. What makes a char array so worthy of a completely different implementation?

Note that if you want the auto iterator over a character array to stop early there is an easy mechanism to do that: Add a if (c == '0') break; statement to the body of your loop.

Bottom line: There is no inconsistency here. The auto iterator over a char[] array is consistent with how auto iterator work any other C-style array.

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5  
This answer just repeats what asker said in the question, it does not address the question at all (see last paragraph) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 18 '11 at 3:23

According to N3290 6.5.4, if the range is an array, boundary values are initialized automatically without begin/end function dispatch.
So, how about preparing some wrapper like the following?

struct literal_t {
    char const *b, *e;
    literal_t( char const* b, char const* e ) : b( b ), e( e ) {}
    char const* begin() const { return b; }
    char const* end  () const { return e; }
};

template< int N >
literal_t literal( char const (&a)[N] ) {
    return literal_t( a, a + N - 1 );
};

Then the following code will be valid:

for (auto e : literal("hello")) ...

If your compiler provides user-defined literal, it might help to abbreviate:

literal operator"" _l( char const* p, std::size_t l ) {
    return literal_t( p, p + l ); // l excludes '\0'
}

for (auto e : "hello"_l) ...

EDIT: The following will have smaller overhead (user-defined literal won't be available though).

template< size_t N >
char const (&literal( char const (&x)[ N ] ))[ N - 1 ] {
    return (char const(&)[ N - 1 ]) x;
}

for (auto e : literal("hello")) ...
share|improve this answer
    
I have an implementation for literal: std::string. Use the tools at hand. Everyone knows C strings have a terminating NULL. –  emsr Jul 18 '11 at 23:36
    
Thank you for pointing out. Though the above way might give brevity with user-defined literal, it has an overhead, and seems not to have much advantage over std::string. I should've mentioned an obvious way with an array. I edited the answer. –  Ise Wisteria Jul 19 '11 at 10:29

If you wanted the length, you should use strlen() for the C string and .length() for the C++ string. You can't treat C strings and C++ strings identically--they have different behavior.

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1  
The question is related to how the updated C++ standard (C++0x) defines for (auto e: someexp) {} and how that differs when the expression is a string-lit rather than a char-array or std::string -- hence it got nothing to do with strlen or the correct method of getting the length. –  Soren Jul 18 '11 at 5:41
1  
@Soren: It is related. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 18 '11 at 6:26
    
@Soren the original poster explicitly called out length as one of the reasons he thought this behavior was wrong. –  robert Jul 18 '11 at 12:05
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The inconsistency can be resolved using another tool in C++0x's toolbox: user-defined literals. Using an appropriately-defined user-defined literal:

std::string operator""s(const char* p, size_t n)
{
    return string(p, n);
}

We'll be able to write:

int i = 0;     
for (auto e : "hello"s)         
    ++i;     
std::cout << "Number of elements: " << i << '\n';

Which now outputs the expected number:

Number of elements: 5

With these new std::string literals, there is arguably no more reason to use C-style string literals, ever.

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3  
Note: User-defined literals must start with an underscore. Also, another answer already suggested literals - why not accept that one? –  Xeo Jan 12 '12 at 15:25

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