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I'm using an invocation described in this question: Synchronization accross threads / atomic checks?

I need to create an method invoker that any thread can call, which will execute on the main executing thread at a specific given point in its execution.

I ended up using this implementation of the Invoker class: I am aware that is might not be the most efficient in terms of locking, but it's theoretically working in a similar enough way than Thread.MemoryBarrier(), such as the one SLaks suggested.

EDIT: With MRAB's suggestions.

public class Invoker
{
    private Queue<Action> Actions { get; set; }

    public Invoker()
    {
        this.Actions = new Queue<Action>();
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Executing {0} actions on thread {1}", this.Actions.Count, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);

        while (this.Actions.Count > 0)
        {
            Action action;

            lock (this.Actions)
            {
                action = this.Actions.Dequeue();
            }

            action();
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Executed, {0} actions left", this.Actions.Count);
    }

    public void Invoke(Action action, bool block = true)
    {
        if (block)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Invoking");
            SemaphoreSlim semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(0, 1);

            lock (this.Actions)
            {
                this.Actions.Enqueue(delegate
                {
                    try
                    {
                        action();
                        Console.WriteLine("Actioned");
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Exception thrown by action");
                        throw;
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        semaphore.Release();
                        Console.WriteLine("Released");
                    }
                });
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Enqueued");

            Console.WriteLine("Waiting on thread {0}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
            semaphore.Wait();
            Console.WriteLine("Waited");
            semaphore.Dispose();
        }
        else
        {
            this.Actions.Enqueue(action);
        }
    }
}

The many Console.WriteLine are there to help me track my freezing, which happens regardless of whether or not this logging is present (i.e., they are not responsible of the freezing and can be discarded as culprits).

The freezing occurs in a scenario where:

  1. An execution thread runs in a loop (calling Invoker.Execute).
  2. On 2 other threads, 2 methods are invoked relatively simultaneously (calling Invoker.Invoke).
  3. The first method works and gets invoked fine, but the second one freezes after "Waiting", that is, after semaphore.Wait().

Example output:

Executing 0 actions on thread 1
Executed, 0 actions left
Executing 0 actions on thread 1
Executed, 0 actions left
Invoking
Enqueued
Waiting on thread 7
Executing 1 actions on thread 1
Actioned
Released
Executed, 0 actions left
Waited
Invoking
Enqueued
Waiting on thread 8

What I suspect to be happening is that the execution thread somehow blocks, hence not executing the second enqueued action, and not releasing the semaphore (semaphore.Release()), and thus not allowing the execution to proceed.

But that is extremely weird (in my opinion), since the execution is on another thread than the semaphore blocking, and so it shouldn't block, right?

I've tried to build a test case that reproduces the problem out of the context environment, but I can't get it to reproduce. I post it here as an illustration of the 3 steps I explained earlier.

static class Earth
{
    public const bool IsRound = true;
}

class Program
{
    static Invoker Invoker = new Invoker();

    static int i;

    static void TestInvokingThread()
    {
        Invoker.Invoke(delegate { Thread.Sleep(300); }); // Simulate some work
    }

    static void TestExecutingThread()
    {
        while (Earth.IsRound)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(100); // Simulate some work

            Invoker.Execute();

            Thread.Sleep(100); // Simulate some work
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        new Thread(TestExecutingThread).Start();

        Random random = new Random();

        Thread.Sleep(random.Next(3000)); // Enter at a random point

        new Thread(TestInvokingThread).Start();
        new Thread(TestInvokingThread).Start();
    }
}

Output (as supposed to occur):

Executing 0 actions on thread 12
Executed, 0 actions left
Executing 0 actions on thread 12
Executed, 0 actions left
Invoking
Enqueued
Waiting on thread 13
Invoking
Enqueued
Waiting on thread 14
Executing 2 actions on thread 12
Actioned
Released
Waited
Actioned
Released
Waited
Executed, 0 actions left
Executing 0 actions on thread 12
Executed, 0 actions left
Executing 0 actions on thread 12

The actual question: What I'm asking, at this point, is if any experienced threading programmer can see a logical mistake in the Invoker class that could ever make it block, as I see no possible way of that happening. Similarly, if you can illustrate a test case that makes it block, I can probably find where mine went wrong. I don't know how to isolate the problem.

Note: I'm quite sure this is not really regarded as a quality question for its specificity, but I'm mostly posting as a desperate cry for help, as this is hobby programming and I have no coworker to ask. After a day of trial and error, I still can't fix it.

Important update: I just had this bug occur on the first invocation too, not necessarily only on the second. Therefore, it can really freeze by itself in the invoker. But how? Where?

share|improve this question
    
I can see that going into bounty for obvious reasons. Many thanks to anyone who feels like tackling to brute code and no precise quesiton without the need for a bounty. –  Lazlo Jul 17 '11 at 23:30
    
In your Invoke method, you should protect the Actions Queue from concurrent access when !block and similarly in the Execute method. You could always use ConcurrentQueue instead. –  spender Jul 17 '11 at 23:37
    
Ok, but all tests are conducted with block = true. –  Lazlo Jul 17 '11 at 23:38
    
Sure. It's quite important nonetheless. –  spender Jul 17 '11 at 23:41
    
@Hans Passant: Indeed, I realize that now. In some previous design it made some sense. It is like MRAB's post now. EDIT: Seems like you deleted your comment. I also edited my main post to reflect changes. –  Lazlo Jul 18 '11 at 0:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you should lock on Actions when enqueuing and dequeuing. I occasionally had a null-reference exception here:

this.Actions.Dequeue()();

probably because a race condition.

I also think that the enqueued code should not dispose of the semphore, but just leave that to the enqueuing thread:

        Console.WriteLine("Invoking");
        SemaphoreSlim semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(0, 1);

        this.Actions.Enqueue(delegate
        {
            action();
            Console.WriteLine("Actioned");
            semaphore.Release();
            Console.WriteLine("Released");
        });

        Console.WriteLine("Enqueued");

        Console.WriteLine("Waiting");
        semaphore.Wait();
        Console.WriteLine("Waited");
        semaphore.Dispose();

again because of race conditions.

EDIT: It has occurred to me that if the action throws an exception for some reason, the semaphore won't be released, so:

                this.Actions.Enqueue(delegate
                {
                    try
                    {
                        action();
                        Console.WriteLine("Actioned");
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("Exception thrown by action");
                        throw;
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        semaphore.Release();
                        Console.WriteLine("Released");
                    }
                });

Could that be the problem?

EDIT: Are you locking this.Actions when modifying it?

When dequeuing:

            Action action;
            lock (this.Actions)
            {
                action = this.Actions.Dequeue();
            }
            action();

and enqueuing:

            lock (this.Actions)
            {
                this.Actions.Enqueue(delegate
                {
                    ...
                });
            }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. These are 2 good points. I don't remember why I ever wanted to dispose in the delegate. Although since it does not fix any of the core bug, nor answer the primary question, it could be posted as a comment. –  Lazlo Jul 18 '11 at 0:16
    
So it still freezes even with those changes? –  MRAB Jul 18 '11 at 0:23
    
Yes, it does. Could semaphore possibly affect all threads? I just don't see where it logically freezes. Feel like going to the chat to discuss? chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/836/… –  Lazlo Jul 18 '11 at 0:24
    
Main post updated with your code instead, for reduced confusion. –  Lazlo Jul 18 '11 at 0:32
    
@Your edit: Nice thinking, I really got hopeful, but sadly it still blocked. Maybe it could be something like that in the execution? –  Lazlo Jul 18 '11 at 0:43

Got it. It was a really deep multi-layer deadlock across my program, hence why I couldn't reproduce it easily. I will mark MRAB's answer as accepted however, for it might have been a real cause of locks caused by the Invoker itself.

share|improve this answer
    
It's nice to know you've found the problem. –  MRAB Jul 19 '11 at 2:13

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