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I am having trouble with some file IO stuff.

I have this file:

db.dat:

Ryan
12 69.00 30.00 0.00
Bindy Lee
25 120.00 89.00 1.00

And this is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define RECORDS 30
#define LEN 20

main()
{
    FILE *fptr;
    fptr = fopen("db.dat", "r");
    int i;
    int counter = 2;

    for (i = 0; i < counter; i++)
    {
        char temp1[LEN];
        char temp2[LEN + 10];

        fgets(temp1, LEN, fptr);
        fgets(temp2, LEN, fptr);
        printf("%s %s", temp1, temp2);
    }

    fclose(fptr);      
}

I am supposed to get both lines, but I am getting this instead:

Ryan
 12 69.00 30.00 0.00
 Bindy Lee

Can someone please help! I don't know why I am not getting both lines, and why I am getting spaces. Very odd...Thanks!!!!

share|improve this question
    
Please refrain from adding explicit cries for help on the question title. Some people don't like answering questions like that. –  hugomg Jul 18 '11 at 2:38
    
I'm sorry, I promise I will not do it again. I am new to the CSE world, and am learning the informal rules. Thank you for telling me, I will refrain from doing this again. –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:50
    
Its not that big of a deal actually. –  hugomg Jul 18 '11 at 3:20
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

fgets stops after it reads LEN characters OR reaches the end of the line. I think your problem here is that you made LEN too small.

Change your printf to something more verbose like printf("temp1='%s'\ntemp2='%s'\n", temp1, temp2); and you should be able to see what was actually read into each string.

share|improve this answer
    
YOU ARE RIGHT! THANKS!!!! –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:48
    
Thanks everyone else too, I truly appreciate it! –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:48
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For the additional " ":

change:

printf("%s %s", temp1, temp2);

to

printf("%s%s", temp1, temp2);

Since the string has already contained the '\n'.

Reference:

A newline character makes fgets stop reading, but it is considered a valid 
character and therefore it is included in the string copied to str.
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I thought of that, but it wasn't helping. I fixed the issue now. Thanks! –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:49
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You are only reading 40 bytes. If you increase the LEN you can read the remaining line,

Or instead of reading by number of bytes, you could read the entire line until there is a new line

#include <string.h>

#define RECORDS 30
#define LEN 20

main()
{
    FILE *fptr;
    fptr = fopen("b.db", "r");
    int i;
    int counter = 4;

    for (i = 0; i < counter; i++)
    {
        char temp1[LEN];
        fscanf(fptr, "%[^\n]%*c", temp1);
        printf("%s\n", temp1);
    }

    fclose(fptr);      
}

If you are interested in reading name and his corresponding record at the same time you could tweak something like,

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define RECORDS 30
#define LEN 20

main()
{
    FILE *fptr;
    fptr = fopen("b.db", "r");
    int i;
    int counter = 2;

    for (i = 0; i < counter; i++)
    {
        char temp1[LEN];
        char temp2[RECORDS];
        fscanf(fptr, "%[^\n]%*c%[^\n]%*c", temp1, temp2);
        printf("%s ---- %s\n", temp1, temp2);
    }

    fclose(fptr);      
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!!!!!! –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:48
    
Using fscanf like that is unsafe, because it has no overflow protection. Adding overflow protection is possible, but it's extremely difficult to do correctly. I would never recommend using fscanf over fgets to a newcomer to the language, and only rarely (and under specific circumstances) would I recommend using it over fgets to anyone. This is not one of those circumstances. -1 –  Chris Lutz Jul 18 '11 at 2:52
    
What kind of circumstances? I used fgets in my real program (this is just an excerpt), and then used sscanf on the string I got from fgets. Is this alright, or also harmful in the same way? –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:58
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Given that you're taking structured input, you might consider using scanf instead of fgets. It isn't clear to me what you're saying with "I am supposed to get both lines".

Code that should work better for this would be something like:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define RECORDS 30
#define LEN 20

main()
{
    FILE *fptr;
    fptr = fopen("db.dat", "r");
    int i;
    int counter = 3;

    for (i = 0; i < counter; i++)
    {
        char temp1[LEN];
        char temp2[LEN + 10];

        fgets(temp1, LEN, fptr);
        fgets(temp2, LEN, fptr);
        printf("%s%s", temp1, temp2);
    }

    fclose(fptr);
}

The biggest thing is you weren't reading the last line and you didn't need the space between the "%s %s" in the printf statement. "%s%s" should work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
I was just putting the space to help distinguish. But ya I know what you mean. Thanks, I overlooked that. –  seyelent Jul 18 '11 at 2:49
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I have a try, and debug; I find the problem just like what missingno said: "fgets stops after it reads LEN characters OR reaches the end of the line. I think your problem here is that you made LEN too small."

the first time (count = 0), temp2 does not get the '\n'; the second time (count = 0), temp1 get the '\n'; this is why, you can have a try and debug your code.....

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