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I have a subversion repository, and I would like to create a branch, but the repository does not have the canonical directory structure of /trunk, /branches and /tags - it just has everything that should be in /trunk, in the root folder.

Am I screwed, or is there some way to correct the directory structure (or to create a branch within the existing directory structure)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try something along the lines of

$ svn mkdir $REPO/{trunk,tags,branches}
$ for f in $(svn ls $REPO |grep -v 'trunk/$\|tags/$\|branches/$'); do
`   svn mv "$f" $REPO/trunk
` done
$ svn cp $REPO/trunk $REPO/branches/branch0
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Hmm... but what if I need to branch from an older revision? $REPO/trunk did not exist at that older revision... –  HighCommander4 Jul 18 '11 at 3:14
    
I figured it out... basically, I moved everything to trunk in one commit; then updated back to the revision where I wanted to branch; then I copied the original directories (which in this older revision were still at the root) one-by-one to branch0 (it would not let me copy the root itself to branch0); then I updated to the newest revision again (which, miraculously, worked!); and finally, committed the branch in a second commit. –  HighCommander4 Jul 18 '11 at 3:56

Branch in svn is just a reference to a revision (that looks and acts like a complete copy).

So as long as you need to copy all your current trunk somewhere - you have to move all the files from root to subdirectory. Otherwise you have no valid points to copy your files to.

Moving to subdirectory can be performed as creating general directory and copying all the files and directories from the root via svn cp file by file and directory by directory.

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