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here i meet a strange problem about c read function in linux.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv){
    int fd=open("a.c",O_RDONLY);
    if(fd==-1){
      fprintf(stderr,"%s\n",strerror(errno));
    }
    char buf[10];
    if(read(fd,buf,9)==-1){
      fprintf(stderr,"%s\n",strerror(errno));
    }else{
      printf("%s\n",buf);
    }
}

i think the buf should be initialize to zero, so the first 9 char read to buffer and the last one is '\0' and it like a string. but the resule is odd, below is a.c file and the result of this program, a.c

    1234567890abcd

result

    1234567893øþzôo`

seems this string is out of buffer, I can't figure out what happened, can anyone help me? thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You said "i think the buf should be initialize to zero". The compiler does not do this automatically for you, so you will need to do it yourself if that is what you want:

char buf[10];
memset(buf, 0, sizeof(buf));

Before the buffer is initialized, you have no guarantees on what its contents will be.

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2  
Or even char buf[10] = {0};. –  Huw Jul 18 '11 at 3:36
    
set to 0 is OK, but as default why the compiler did not initialize buf to zero? I change code to static char buf[10], then it has a right output, I think char buf[10] and static char buf[10] have the same static duration, and should be default initialized in the same way –  user not found Jul 18 '11 at 5:52
    
ok. i got it, they are different, I got a mistake understanding. char buf[10] will not initialize because it is in main() block. thanks you guys. –  user not found Jul 18 '11 at 6:22
    
No matter where you define the buffer, if you don't provide an initializer or explicitly initialize the buffer at some point, you have no guarantee about what the buffer's contents will be. –  David Grayson Jul 18 '11 at 23:05
    
but if define it outside the function block, in that case it is a global variable, it will default initialize to zero. –  user not found Jul 19 '11 at 1:20
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When you print a character array without ending '\0', printf will print all characters till it finds '\0' in the memory. In this case, looks like '1234567893øþzôo` is followed by '\0'. Note that printf does not know the size of 'buf' array, hence it will print even those characters present after the end of buf array.

As you have suggested it is better to either set entire buffer to 0 or add '\0' explicitly at the end (as shown in below code).

   buf[9] = '\0';
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ISTM your buffer is not zero-terminated, since you only read 9 characters. Change the last part of your code:

  if(read(fd,buf,9)==-1){
    fprintf(stderr,"%s\n",strerror(errno));
  }else{

    /* add this */ 
    buf[9] = '\0';

    printf("%s\n",buf);
  }
}

What happens if you add that?

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You should initialize buf to all 0.

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