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In my rendering I sometimes my objects are completely opaque, sometimes the objects have some alpha to them. By alpha, I mean like a leaf texture where only the leaf part is shown and the other pixels are not (so transparency on part of the texture). For blending, I mean setting the destination blend and source blends.

However, do I need two render lists or three render lists? I first have a render list of all of the possible objects that can be rendered. From there, I split it into two lists, Opaque and "Alpha Enabled" (which will be rendered back to front). However, for those with blends on them, but yet, no alpha level changes, should these be in a separate list or should they be in either the opaque or alpha lists?

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Any suggestions anyone? –  chadb Jul 18 '11 at 20:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need two lists, one for opaque, one for transparent.

Anything that is to be visually blended with other geometry 'behind it' should be in the blended list, whether blending is based on an alpha channel or some other add/subscribe/multiply/whatever blending state. Render back to front, make sure individual primitives are convex and do not intersect each other..

Alpha testing, like Goz states, is the exception as it does z-writes based on the alpha mask. It goes in the opaque pile.

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As an aside when doing an additive blend you don't need to sort the geometry ... –  Goz Jul 20 '11 at 14:03
    
In case you're using Intel's haswell processor, you might want take advantage of a neat Direct X extension called "Pixel Sync". More details here –  Raja Sep 30 '13 at 6:24

If you use alpha testing then you can push the alpha tested parts through the opaque pipeline. So, provided I'm understanding you right, you only need 2 render lists.

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Which two render lists would that be? –  chadb Jul 19 '11 at 19:10
    
@Chadb: Opaque and Alpha. Alpha tested geometry is still opaque. –  Goz Jul 20 '11 at 9:24
    
I don't think he is using Alpha Testing, but good point. –  Paul-Jan Jul 20 '11 at 12:51

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