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Checking if an int is prime more efficiently

bool isPrime(int num)
{
    for(int i = 2; i <= (num/2)+1; i++)
    {
        if(num % i == 0)
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

I've looked on Wikipedia, but I don't understand any of the fast primality tests it describes.

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marked as duplicate by Kirill V. Lyadvinsky, Greg Hewgill, Mat, Mark B, iammilind Jul 18 '11 at 5:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Other than the simple errors in your algorithm noted below, the "better" ways are much more complex. Mathematicians have studied prime numbers for centuries. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 18 '11 at 4:15
    
@Kirill: read the other question before marking as dupe, that question is about finding a prime with certain characteristics (i.e. many numbers must be tested). I do believe this question has been asked before, but that isn't it. –  Ben Voigt Jul 18 '11 at 4:18

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For one thing, you only need to iterate while i * i <= num.

After that, you might notice that testing whether a number is a multiple of 2 is just a bit test. Once you know the number isn't even, you know there are no even factors, so you can skip testing them.

That leads to:

bool isPrime(int num)
{
    if (num < 4) return true;
    if (~num & 1) return false;
    for( int i = 3; i * i <= num; i += 2 )
    {
        if (num % i == 0) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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Are you sure about if (~num & 1) return false; –  Loki Astari Jul 18 '11 at 4:19
    
@Martin: Pretty sure. Even numbers not less than four are not prime. Do you have a case it fails for? –  Ben Voigt Jul 18 '11 at 4:20
1  
Maybe you should add if (num < 1) return false; because, IIRC, prime numbers are by definition greater than 1. –  Seth Carnegie Jul 18 '11 at 4:23
    
@Seth: I'm providing the same result as the question for those. (And it would be if (num < 2)) Anyway, 0 and 1 may not be prime but they aren't composite either. –  Ben Voigt Jul 18 '11 at 4:25
    
@Ben Voigt: No. Just trying to work out what it meant. –  Loki Astari Jul 18 '11 at 4:40

If your input set is particular small, then you can have a step where in you construct the primes using sieve of erathones and then do a primality test on that sieve. This is the next step after your algorithm.

There are many performance tweaks that you can make for faster primality testing, like skipping the factors of 2 and 3 etc.

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The better way(if you want speed up your application) is pre-calculate at first prime numbers, add them into array and just search your number in it, or check division on array elements.

Also you can check num % i == 0 not upto num/2, but up to sqrt(num).

PS:

if(num % i == 0)
        {
            return true;
        }

You must return false:)

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For something faster than your approach, you should build a primes table using Sieve of Eratosthenes or the like (generate primes at least as far as the number you're testing). Then just look your number up using binary searching. If you keep the table around, you can incrementally build it up if you later need to look up a higher number.

Gogo dynamic programming. :-)

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Few things you can do to speed this up:

Instead of starting from 2 and doing i++, check if it's even in the beginning first, and if it's not, start at 3 and increment i by two:

if (num % 2 == 0) {
   return false;
}
for (int i = 3; i <= sqrt(num); i += 2) { ... }

Another tip already in this example is to set your upper bound to the square root of your number instead of num/2.

One more thing that requires a little bit of setup is to employ a prime sieve to quickly test if your number is prime.

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I do not recommend doing the i <= sqrt(num) test every iteration. Instead, store sqrt(num) in a variable of type int (or long, or another integral type), and compare against that in each iteration. –  Chris Jester-Young Jul 18 '11 at 4:21

The Miller-Rabin test is relatively simple to implement, although proving it's correct is much more difficult. Basically, you run this test several times; each time, you pick a random "witness" number between 2 and your number, and run an algorithm. The test will either tell you that your number is definitely composite (not prime) or that it could be prime (with probability 1/4 that it's wrong each time), so if you run the test ten times with ten random witnesses and get "probably prime" every time, chances are less than one in a million that the number is actually composite.

Wikipedia has an implementation in pseudocode at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller-Rabin_test#Algorithm_and_running_time

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