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I am a newcomer to programming learning C by myself.

Give a list of integers in nondecreasing order. You need to delete the repeated elements and output the list with only unique elements.

Example: Input: 2 3 5 6 8 8 9 11 11 11 20 Output: 2 3 5 6 8 9 11 20

Here is my code that works. But if I delete "else break" statement (I know this would produce the wrong output), how come it gave me the output 2 3 5 6 8 8 9 11? I guess I still haven't grasped the logic of break.

Thanks!

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAXSIZE 100
typedef int ElemType;
typedef struct{
    ElemType data[MAXSIZE];
    int length;
}SqList;

void Create_SqList(SqList *L, int n){
        L->length=n;
    int i=0;
    printf("\ninput %d data: ", n);
    while(i<n){
        scanf("%d", &L->data[i]);
        i++;
    }
}

void Print_SqList(SqList *L){
    int i, n;
    n=L->length;
    i=0;
    printf("\noutput %d data: ", n);
    while(i<n){
        printf("%d ", L->data[i]);
        i++;
    }
    printf("\n");
}

void Reduce_SqList(SqList *L){
    int n = L->length;
    int i, j, k, count=0;
    ElemType t;
    for(i=0;i<n;i++){
       t=L->data[i];
       for(j=i+1;j<n;j++){
        if(L->data[j]==t)   
            count++;    
             else break;      // without break, it produeced the wrong output!
       }


       if(count){
        for(k=j;k<n;k++)
            L->data[k-count]=L->data[k];
        n=n-count;
        count=0;
       }
    }
    L->length=n;
}


int main(){
    SqList L;
    int n;
    printf("\ninput n: ");
    scanf("%d",&n);
    Create_SqList(&L,n);
    Print_SqList(&L);
    Reduce_SqList(&L);
    Print_SqList(&L);

    return 0;
}
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5 Answers 5

break exits the loop immediately.

for(j=i+1;j<n;j++){
    if(L->data[j]==t)   
        count++;    
             else break;      // without break, it produeced the wrong output!

   }

First, let's make it more readable.

for(j=i+1;j<n;j++) {
    if(L->data[j]==t) { 
        count++;    
    } else {
        break;
    }
}

This code does the exact same thing but it is more readable. Without reading the rest of your solution, I can explain what break is doing to change your program's flow.

The for loop counts upwards until the condition j < n is no longer met.

However, it can also be terminated by the "break" statement. So with the if condition you added, the loop will also terminate whenever L->data[j] != t, which triggers the else clause that breaks your code out of the loop. The program continues executing immediately after the loop.

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break makes the flow of control just jump out of the current loop structure (for, while, do-while). In your example, the logic is different if you jump out, and it ends the counting early when you break. If you don't, then the loop keeps running, and you get more results.

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Break breaks out of the current loop. You can use it to break out of For loops, While loops or Do Loops. You also use it to break out of switch statements, to prevent logic from flowing into the next switch clause.

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The "break" simply terminates your "for()" loop. The inner "for()" loop.

So the loop will execute UNTIL:

  • j >= n

    ... or ...

  • L->data[j] != t

Whichever comes first :)

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I found your bug: you rely on j being the last position of the duplicate value. Without the break j increments until it is equal to n.

This messes up the logic here:

   if(count){
    for(k=j;k<n;k++)
        L->data[k-count]=L->data[k];
    n=n-count;
    count=0;
   }
}
L->length=n;
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