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The below example was taken from the book, "Javascript: The good parts". The author says that the helper function returns a function that binds to the current value of var i.

Can any one explain what makes it to bind the VALUE instead of REFERENCE of var i, because helper function is a closure to add_the_handler function and should only see the reference of var i

var add_the_handlers = function (nodes) {
   var helper = function (i) {
      return function (e) {
        alert(i);
      };
    };
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < nodes.length; i += 1) {
       nodes[i].onclick = helper(i);
    }
};
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4  
The i variable in the function (e) { alert(i); }; function is referenced to the local i variable in the helper function, instead of i variable in the add_the_handlers function. –  Andrey M. Jul 18 '11 at 4:40
    
This post/answer will be helpful (on pass by reference vs. value): stackoverflow.com/questions/6605640/… –  jfriend00 Jul 18 '11 at 4:59
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you were to say:

nodes[i].onclick = function(){ alert(i) };

The function would not have it's own copy of i because i is not declared within the scope of the function.

To help you see this better I've modified your above code:

var add_the_handlers = function (nodes) {
    var helper = function(t) {
      // t is in the scope of "helper"
      return function(e){
        // e is in the scope of this anonymous function
        // and is not used
        alert(t);
      };
    };

    // Variables declared here are in the scope of "add_the_handlers"
    var i;
    for (i = 0; i < nodes.length; i += 1) {
       nodes[i].onclick = helper(i);
    }
};

In the "real world" you'll often see code like the above shortened to look like this:

var add_the_handlers = function(nodes){
    var i;
    for(i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++)
       nodes[i].onclick = (function(i){ return function(e){ alert(i); }; })(i);
};
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I believe, you should return a function like this, nodes[i].onclick = (function(i){ return function(e){alert(i);} })(i); –  Deepan Jul 18 '11 at 5:02
    
Yes, that is what I meant. Thanks :) I fixed my post –  Paulpro Jul 18 '11 at 5:04
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You pass the current value of i into the function helper. Inside that function the variable i, a (confusingly named) parameter to the function, is different from any other i. The closure returned thus binds to that particular i (really the [[scope]] which contains that i, but...).

Happy coding.

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This is a guess: i is a primitive, so it's always accessed by value, and not by reference.

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Nope, not at all :) It's not about object mutability, but rather about variable resolving. A new variable [[scope]] in JavaScript is only created with a new function declaration. –  user166390 Jul 18 '11 at 4:51
    
I see now; thanks for explaining. –  bbg Jul 18 '11 at 4:55
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