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def removeDuplicatesFromList(seq): 
    # Not order preserving 
    keys = {}
    for e in seq:
        keys[e] = 1
    return keys.keys()

def countWordDistances(li):
    '''
    If li = ['that','sank','into','the','ocean']    
    This function would return: { that:1, sank:2, into:3, the:4, ocean:5 }
    However, if there is a duplicate term, take the average of their positions
    '''
    wordmap = {}
    unique_words = removeDuplicatesFromList(li)
    for w in unique_words:
        distances = [i+1 for i,x in enumerate(li) if x == w]
        wordmap[w] = float(sum(distances)) / float(len(distances)) #take average
    return wordmap

How do I make this function faster?

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8 Answers

import collections
def countWordDistances(li):
    wordmap = collections.defaultdict(list)
    for i, w in enumerate(li, 1):
        wordmap[w].append(i)
    for k, v in wordmap.iteritems():
        wordmap[k] = sum(v)/float(len(v))

    return wordmap

This makes only one pass through the list, and keeps operations to a minimum. I timed this on a word list with 1.1M entries, 29k unique words, and it was almost twice as fast as Patrick's answer. On a list of 10k words, 2k unique, it was more than 300x faster than the OP's code.

To make Python code go faster, there are two rules to keep in mind: use the best algorithm, and avoid Python.

On the algorithm front, iterating the list once instead of N+1 times (N= number of unique words) is the main thing that will speed this up.

On the "avoid Python" front, I mean: you want your code to be executing in C as much as possible. So using defaultdict is better than a dict where you explicitly check if the key is present. defaultdict does that check for you, but does it in C, in the Python implementation. enumerate is better than for i in range(len(li)), again because it's fewer Python steps. And enumerate(li, 1) makes the counting start at 1 instead of having to have a Python +1 somewhere in the loop.

Edited: Third rule: use PyPy. My code goes twice as fast on PyPy as on 2.7.

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+1 for cool optimizations. I had a decent idea of the best algorithm but didn't have the Python knowhow you clearly have. –  Patrick Jul 18 '11 at 12:20
    
Why not accumulate the sufficient statistics total and number instead? I'll add an answer. –  Neil G Jul 18 '11 at 16:57
    
@Neil G: good job, yours is about 10% faster than mine, and suggests another rule: avoid memory allocations. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 18 '11 at 17:50
    
+1 for "avoid Python [by using Python smartly]" - from your tweet I was expecting "avoid Python" to be about native extensions or something. –  Russell Borogove Jul 18 '11 at 18:47
    
"Use PyPy" and "Avoid python" don't come that well together. Preferably "use PyPy" and "use Python"? –  fijal Jul 19 '11 at 22:58
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Based off @Ned Batchelder's solution, but without creating dummy lists:

import collections
def countWordDistances(li):
    wordmap = collections.defaultdict(lambda:[0.0, 0.0])
    for i, w in enumerate(li, 1):
        wordmap[w][0] += i
        wordmap[w][1] += 1.0
    for k, (t, n) in wordmap.iteritems():
        wordmap[k] = t / n
    return wordmap
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1  
OK, how's this for a gross hack: if you only need a list of two reals, then use a single complex number instead! It cuts 25% off the running time of your solution, but yuck! –  Ned Batchelder Jul 18 '11 at 18:04
    
@Ned: Ha, yeah! Did you try lambda:numpy.zeros(2)? You would know better than I, but one day, I'm hoping that someone writes a great Python optimizer so that we can focus on the algorithms (which is I why I fell in love with Python.) –  Neil G Jul 18 '11 at 23:05
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I'm not sure if this will be faster than using a set, but it requires only one pass through the list:

def countWordDistances(li):
    wordmap = {}
    for i in range(len(li)):
        if li[i] in wordmap:
            avg, num = wordmap[li[i]]
            new_avg = avg*(num/(num+1.0)) + (1.0/(num+1.0))*i
            wordmap[li[i]] = new_avg, num+1
        else:
            wordmap[li[i]] = (i, 1)

    return wordmap

This returns a modified version of wordmap, with the values associated with each key being a tuple of the average position and the number of occurences. You could obviously easily transform this to the form of the original output, but this would take some time.

The code basically keeps a running average while iterating through the list, recalculating each time by taking a weighted average.

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Making only one pass through the list is key. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 18 '11 at 11:12
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Use a set:

def countWordDistances(li):
    '''
    If li = ['that','sank','into','the','ocean']    
    This function would return: { that:1, sank:2, into:3, the:4, ocean:5 }
    However, if there is a duplicate term, take the average of their positions
    '''
    wordmap = {}
    unique_words = set(li)
    for w in unique_words:
        distances = [i+1 for i,x in enumerate(li) if x == w]
        wordmap[w] = float(sum(distances)) / float(len(distances)) #take average
    return wordmap
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The first thing that springs to mind is to use a set to remove duplicate words:

unique_words = set(li)

In general, though, if you're worried about speed you need to profile the function to see where the bottleneck is, and then try to reduce that bottleneck.

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Use a frozenset instead of a dict, since you're not doing anything with the values:

def removeDuplicatesFromList(seq):
    return frozenset(seq)
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Everyone else recommends using set. What's the advantage of using frozenset? –  user849364 Jul 18 '11 at 5:01
    
@user849364: The main difference is that a set is mutable, whereas a frozenset is immutable. There's no performance advantage, I believe, but it tells the readers of your code that the set is not going to be modfied. See the Python docs for more information. –  Adam Rosenfield Jul 18 '11 at 17:11
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Using list comprehension:

def countWordDistances(l):
    unique_words = set(l)
    idx = [[i for i,x in enumerate(l) if x==item]
            for item in unique_words]
    return {item:1.*sum(idx[i])/len(idx[i]) + 1.
            for i,item in enumerate(unique_words)}

li = ['that','sank','into','the','ocean']
countWordDistances(li)
# {'into': 3.0, 'ocean': 5.0, 'sank': 2.0, 'that': 1.0, 'the': 4.0}

li2 = ['that','sank','into','the','ocean', 'that']
countWordDistances(li2)
# {'into': 3.0, 'ocean': 5.0, 'sank': 2.0, 'that': 3.5, 'the': 4.0}
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Oneliner -

from __future__ import division   # no need for this if using py3k

def countWordDistances(li):
    '''
    If li = ['that','sank','into','the','ocean']    
    This function would return: { that:1, sank:2, into:3, the:4, ocean:5 }
    However, if there is a duplicate term, take the average of their positions
    '''
    return {w:sum(dist)/len(dist) for w,dist in zip(set(li), ([i+1 for i,x in enumerate(li) if x==w] for w in set(li))) }

What I am making in the last line is a dictionary comprehension, similar to a list comprehension.

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Dictionary comprehensions are available in python 2.7, too. Before that, the same idea can be used by calling dict with a generator comprehension, e.g., `dict((i, 2*i) for i in range(4))' produces '{0: 0, 1: 2, 2: 4, 3: 6}'. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 18 '11 at 9:30
    
oh yes.. I think I read it wrongly somewhere. Thank you. –  Guanidene Jul 18 '11 at 9:38
    
Does this work for you? I get "global name 'w' is not defined" because the "x == w" is inside the loop that defines w. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 18 '11 at 11:20
    
@ Ned: Fixed it! Thank you. –  Guanidene Jul 18 '11 at 11:53
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