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I am converting some Java code to Javascript to run on node.js, and I ran into something peculiar with bit shifting.

The original Java used a long and logical bit shifting, so I've replicated that in Javascript (I get the same results with an arithmetic shift):

var num = 3382;

num >>> 0 & 0xFF; // 54, as expected
num >>> 8 & 0xFF; // 13, as expected
num >>> 16 & 0xFF; // 0, as expected
num >>> 24 & 0xFF; // 0, as expected
num >>> 32 & 0xFF; // 54??
num >>> 40 & 0xFF; // 13??

I get the same results on node, FF 4 and Chrome 12.

It seems that Javascript is wrapping the bits in the integer when it runs out of bits. Javascript, AFAIK, allows up to 32-bit numbers in the background, but this shouldn't be an issue.

Binary Representation

This is what I think is happening:

0-shift: 00000000000000000000110100110110

8-shift: 00110110000000000000000000001101

16-shift: 00001101001101100000000000000000

24-shift: 00000000000011010011011000000000

32-shift: 00000000000000000000110100110110

Sanity Check

I wrote a little test in C to make sure I wasn't going insane (note, there are compile warnings, but that's expected):

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    printf("Bit shift tests:\n");
    printf("3382 >> 0 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 0 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 8 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 8 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 16 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 16 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 24 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 24 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 32 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 32 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 48 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 48 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 56 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 56 & 0xFF);
    printf("3382 >> 64 & 0xFF: %d\n", 3382 >> 64 & 0xFF);
}

Note

I only care about 32-bit numbers. The Java code used 64 bit numbers, but the numbers represent file sizes and I won't be using big files (all under 50 megs or so).

Question

I have read the wikipedia articles about arithmetic and logical bit shifts, but it doesn't seem that Javascript is following the rules.

Could someone explain to me what's going on?

share|improve this question
    
Here is another place you need to go: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… –  mplungjan Jul 18 '11 at 6:11
    
Good resource, but it didn't say anything that I didn't already know. It should be filling zeroes, but it's wrapping the bits around. I'll edit with a binary example. –  tjameson Jul 18 '11 at 6:16
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From http://ecma262-5.com/ELS5_HTML.htm

11.7.3 The Unsigned Right Shift Operator ( >>> )

Performs a zero-filling bitwise right shift operation on the left operand by the amount specified by the right operand.

The production ShiftExpression : ShiftExpression >>> AdditiveExpression is evaluated as follows:

1 Let lref be the result of evaluating ShiftExpression.

2 Let lval be GetValue(lref).

3 Let rref be the result of evaluating AdditiveExpression.

4 Let rval be GetValue(rref).

5 Let lnum be ToUint32(lval).

6 Let rnum be ToUint32(rval).

7 Let shiftCount be the result of masking out all but the least significant 5 bits of rnum, that is, compute rnum & 0x1F.

8 Return the result of performing a zero-filling right shift of lnum by shiftCount bits. Vacated bits are filled with zero. The result is an unsigned 32-bit integer.

Note step 7, the shift count is truncated to 5 bits, so 32 becomes 0 and 40 becomes 8 and the values you are getting conform to the specification.

share|improve this answer
    
Weird... so shifting 32 bits doesn't exist? It's actually shifting 0 bits? –  tjameson Jul 18 '11 at 6:26
    
Yes, all Javascript bit operations are defined on only 32 bits. –  HBP Jul 18 '11 at 7:17
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