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I have example number in the format :

1.1
1.1.4
1.1.5
2.1
2.1.10
2.1.23
3.1a
3.1b
4.1.5
4.2.6
4.7.12

How do I sort it in MySQL ? I can do that easily from the $sort command line option but nothing seems to work in MySQL

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What's wrong with ORDER BY colname? These look like strings so you would get a natural sort by default, no? –  Dan Grossman Jul 18 '11 at 6:50
    
@Dan: How would 2.1.11 and 2.1.2 compare as strings? –  mu is too short Jul 18 '11 at 6:57
    
order will not work. this is what happens : 1.27 1.28 1.3 –  user361697 Jul 18 '11 at 7:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It may work if you split the string into pieces and order by each relevant piece.

SELECT data
FROM example
ORDER BY
    CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(data, '.', 1) AS BINARY) ASC,
    CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(data , '.', 2), '.', -1) AS BINARY) ASC,
    CAST(SUBSTRING_INDEX(SUBSTRING_INDEX(data , '.', -1), '.', 1) AS BINARY) ASC;

Can't say I support doing something like that in MySQL, but I guess it would get you where you need to be, at least with my test data. Just remember you'll need to edit the number if you change the number of elements in the string.

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good. it works it most of the cases except : 1.6.10 1.6.2 –  user361697 Jul 18 '11 at 9:22
    
and also 1.39 1.4 –  user361697 Jul 18 '11 at 9:23
    
That's rounding problems, I'd guess. You'd have to work on the CAST parameters, maybe use CONVERT. The problem is that doing it for integers would be easy with CAST AS UNSIGNED, but that will break on letters. If you know that your first two elements are going to be integers, you can change the first two ORDER BY casts to be CAST AS UNSIGNED, which will handle it properly. –  Naltharial Jul 18 '11 at 9:46

Try ordering by INET_ATON (for MySQL 3.23.15 and newer)

ORDER BY INET_ATON(some_field);

PS. It works for IP addresses, don't know how it handle letters

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sorry this does not doesnt work. –  user361697 Jul 18 '11 at 6:58
    
Thanks! That's great for my case (for IP)! –  VeroLom Dec 6 '13 at 9:26

Was there something wrong with ORDER BY?

I tried:

CREATE TABLE example (data VARCHAR(30));
INSERT INTO example VALUES ('4.2.6'), ('1.1.5'), ('2.1.10'), ('3.1b'), ('2.1'), ('4.7.12'), ('1.1'), ('2.1.23'), ('1.1.4'), ('3.1a'), ('4.1.5');
SELECT * FROM example ORDER BY data;

... and it seemed to work as you'd like. (I can't guarantee that there isn't some corner case where your real data might not ordered by what you'd consider "natural." That seems to be a heuristic term rather than a precisely defined term of art.

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No, it doesn't work. Try to add '2.1.3' :) The problem is that sample data is not correct. –  Karolis Jul 18 '11 at 8:10

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