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If I have a class like this:

class Person { 
def name
def greeting = "hello $name"
}

and I call bob = new Person(name: "bob")

when I inspect Bob at this point i see that the greeting does not have 'bob' in it. What am I doing wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can use the @Lazy annotation to get round this issue

class Person { 
  def name
  @Lazy def greeting = "hello $name"
}

bob = new Person(name: "bob")
println bob.greeting

Will print hello bob as you require. The annotation alters the getter for greeting so that it is only generated the first time it is called (and then the result is cached). This has the side effect of making greeting static once it has been called once, but you don't say whether it is required to change (due to name changing) over time... ie;

bob = new Person(name: "bob")
println bob.greeting
bob.name = 'dave'
println bob.greeting

Will print:

hello bob
hello bob
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hey nice explanation :D –  sriram Jul 18 '11 at 15:28
    
Excellent! I tested this with my large Map and it worked great. And yes I do only want to instantiate it once. The use case here is an Access Control Matrix that is defined in the Grails Service class (thereby being a singleton). –  dbrin Jul 18 '11 at 19:04

I would implement it like this

class Person { 
    def name
    String getGreeting() {"hello $name"}
}

This way greeting is still a property and you can reference it like

def bob = new Person(name: 'Bob')

println bob.greeting
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The drawback here might be that the greeting itself is evaluated (as well as name) every time a getGreeting() is called. My actual example is somewhat larger and creates a Map that I want to be setup once and not calculated again. –  dbrin Jul 18 '11 at 7:53
    
@Dmitry I posted an answer about the @Lazy annotation which might fit if I understood you right –  tim_yates Jul 18 '11 at 8:10

Constructor calls happen after the init of the object. In other words, the greeting value is being set before the constructor is called.

If you want to do what your doing, you will need a constructor which takes the name as a parameter and assigns greeting to "hello: ${name}"

P.s. I'm not quite sure if the parameter assignment (name: "bob") happens after or within the constructor, someone else can probably answer this.

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1  
As far as I know new Person(name: "bob") == Person p = new Person(); p.setName("bob") in groovy –  denis.solonenko Jul 18 '11 at 7:23
    
Steven, thank you for your answer. If I don't have control over writing a new constructor (dealing with a Service class in Grails) - what are my alternatives to force name being set before greetings? Or a rewrite of greetings perhaps? –  dbrin Jul 18 '11 at 7:48
    
Maybe you could just use Person as a plain DTO and evaluate the greeting outside of this class. –  Steven Jul 19 '11 at 2:07

Are you able to add a setter for #name? If you've defined one Groovy will call it.

class Person { 
    def name
    def greeting = "hello"

    void setName(final val) { name = val; greeting = "hello $name" }
}

final o = new Person(name:"bob")
assert o.greeting == "hello bob"
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Thanks for the response. I really liked the @Lazy option for my use case. –  dbrin Jul 18 '11 at 19:05

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