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Need to create some table so I can get an info from it in this way:

table[attacker][id]

And if I'll use

print(table[attacker][id])

It should print the value.

Tried many ways, but haven't found any good ...

I guess it should be something like this...

table.insert(table, attacker, [id] = value)

^ This does not work.

Can someone help me?


Edit

Well, when I try it this way:

x = {}
function xxx()
    if not x[attacker][cid] then
        x[attacker][cid] = value
    else
        x[attacker][cid] = x[attacker][cid] + value
    end
    print(x[attacker][cid])
end

I get an error saying:

attempt to index field '?' (a nil value)

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1  
That error means exactly what it says... x[attacker] is apparently nil. –  Amber Jul 18 '11 at 7:42
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need the curly braces to create the inner table:

table.insert(my_table, attacker, {[id]=value})

or

-- the advantage of this is that it works even if 'attacker' isn't a number
my_table[attacker] = {[id]=value}

a = 1
b = 2
c = 3
d = {}
table.insert(d, a, {[b]=c})
print(d[a][b]) -- prints '3'
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This only works if attacker is an integer, as table.insert only works inserting values into the array part of the table. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 18 '11 at 7:27
    
Sure. Of course, normal table assignment syntax can also work for non-integer keys; I was simply adapting the OP's example to the nearest thing that would work. –  Amber Jul 18 '11 at 7:29
    
edited my question. –  Lucas Jul 18 '11 at 7:36
    
btw. attacker is an integer always, –  Lucas Jul 18 '11 at 7:39
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What is attacker? That is, what value does it contain? It doesn't really matter what it contains since Lua tables can use any Lua value as a key. But it would be useful to know.

In any case, it's really simple.

tableName = {}; --Note: your table CANNOT be called "table", as that table already exists as part of the Lua standard libraries.
tableName[attacker] = {}; --Create a table within the table.
tableName[attacker][id] = value; --put a value in the table within the table.

The problem in your edit happened because you didn't take note of step 2 above. Values in a Lua table are empty (nil) until they have a value. Therefore, until line 2, tableName[attacker] is nil. You cannot index a nil value. You therefore must ensure that any keys in tableName that you expect to index into are in fact tables.

To put it another way, you cannot do tableName[attacker][id] unless you know that type(tableName[attacker]) == "table" is true.

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edited my question –  Lucas Jul 18 '11 at 7:36
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you should use table = {['key']='value'} makes it easier.

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