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I am attempting to parse the following date strings obtained from email headers:

from dateutil import parser
d1 = parser.parse('Tue, 28 Jun 2011 01:46:52 +0200')
d2 = parser.parse('Mon, 11 Jul 2011 10:01:56 +0200 (CEST)')
d3 = parser.parse('Wed, 13 Jul 2011 02:00:01 +0000 (GMT+00:00)')

The third one fails; am I missing something obvious?

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5  
have you tried parser.parse('...', fuzzy=True)? –  phimuemue Jul 18 '11 at 8:03
    
phimuemue, add that as an answer and I will accept it! –  Petter Jul 18 '11 at 8:06
    
eryksun, that is a good suggestion. –  Petter Jul 18 '11 at 8:15
    
@Ben thanks you. –  phimuemue Jul 18 '11 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

have you tried parser.parse('...', fuzzy=True)? (I suppose it works :))

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Yes it works. The problem is the extra "+00:00" after "GMT", as pointed out below. The "fuzzy" option ignores this. –  Petter Jul 19 '11 at 7:55

Give a try to parsedatetime library.

In [16]: import parsedatetime.parsedatetime as pdt

In [17]: p = pdt.Calendar()

In [18]: p.parse("Wed, 13 Jul 2011 02:00:01 +0000 (GMT+00:00)")
Out[18]: ((2011, 7, 20, 0, 0, 0, 2, 201, -1), 3)
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1  
But is it correct? I have difficulty interpreting the tuple. Where is the "13", for example? –  Petter Jul 19 '11 at 8:08
    
It seems that this parser is confused and thinks the "Wed" refers to tomorrow July 20, which is the closest Wednesday. –  Petter Jul 19 '11 at 8:09
    
Looks like parsedatetime always takes future dates. it has a comment in the source code: # if that day and month have already passed in this year, then increment the year by 1 –  warvariuc Jan 10 '12 at 7:37

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