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I am pretty new to Java and I am a little stuck with using SimpleDateFormat and Calendar. I have a Date-Object and want to extract a GMT datestring like yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss. I live in Germany and at the moment we are GMT +0200. My Date-Object's time is for example 2011-07-18 13:00:00. What I need now is 2011-07-18 11:00:00. The offset for my timezone should be calculated automatically.

I tried something like this, but I guess there is a fault somewhere:

private String toGmtString(Date date){
    SimpleDateFormat sd = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss");
    TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getDefault();
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(new SimpleTimeZone(timeZone.getOffset(date.getTime()), "GMT"));
    sd.setCalendar(cal);
    return sd.format(date);
}

On some devices the datestring is returned like I want it to. On other devices the offset isn't calculated right and I receive the date and time from the input date-object. Can you give me some tips or advices? I guess my way off getting the default timezone does not work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
private String toGmtString(Date date){
    SimpleDateFormat sd = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss");
    sd.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT"));
    return sd.format(date);
}

You don't need to create a new SimpleTimeZone, because you aren't inventing a new timezone - there are 2 existing timezones that come into play in your program, GMT and your default one.

You also don't need to modify your existing date object, because you don't want to represent a different point in time - you only want a different way to display the same point in time.

All you need to do is tell the SimpleDateFormat which timezone to use in formatting.

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I can't believe that it is that easy, but of course I will try that too. Give me some minutes please... –  FlyBy Jul 18 '11 at 11:30
    
Ok.. Tested.. I used a date-object which represents 2011-07-18 13:34:27. Using the default date function .toGMTString() I receive 18 Jul 2011 11:43:27 GMT which is the exact point in time that I need.Using my own function I still receive 2011-07-18 13:43:27 which was my problem. Using Jigar Joshin's function I receive 2011-07-18 12:43:27 which is missing 1 hour (european summertime). Using Eli Acherkans function I receive 2011-07-18 11:43:27 which is exactly what I wanted to (Offset including european summertime). –  FlyBy Jul 18 '11 at 11:53
    
+1 <!--------------> –  Jigar Joshi Jul 18 '11 at 11:55
    
Glad to help :) –  Eli Acherkan Jul 18 '11 at 12:14
private String toGmtString(Date date){
    //date formatter
    SimpleDateFormat sd = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss");
    //getting default timeZone
    TimeZone timeZone = TimeZone.getDefault();
    //getting current time
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance()
    cal.setTime(date) ;
    //adding / substracting curren't timezone's offset
    cal.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, -1 * timeZone.getRawOffset());    
    //formatting and returning string of date
    return sd.format(cal.getTime());
}
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Ok this is looking good. I will give it a try in a few minutes. One question. Where and how did you use the date-parameter from the function call?! Should I use cal.setTime(date); after getting the instance? –  FlyBy Jul 18 '11 at 9:40
    
yes exactly. updated it. –  Jigar Joshi Jul 18 '11 at 9:42
    
Nice! Works! Thank you very much! –  FlyBy Jul 18 '11 at 9:46
1  
@Jigar Joshi: you're modifying the point in time instead of modifying the way it's displayed. Your cal object doesn't represent the point in time that is {13:00 in Germany, 11:00 in Greenwich} - it rather represents {11:00 in Germany, 09:00 in Greenwich}. I don't think that this was the intention. –  Eli Acherkan Jul 18 '11 at 10:48
1  
I think this is what OP wanted –  Jigar Joshi Jul 18 '11 at 10:50

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