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I am building a real-time system which (with a use of websockets) updates a table with live data of different frequencies (can be 3 times per second, can be once every 2 seconds - dependant on the type of data). I am currently struggling to find a way of letting the user know when a particular field has not been updated in the last 5 seconds. That is, if no new data is fetched, I shouldn't keep the old value there, but rather change it to '--' or something similar.

After a long way to the javascript, final function which updates fields looks like that (extremely simplified):

function changeValue(data){
        var fieldId= data.fieldId;
        var value = Math.round(data.value);
        $('span#'+fieldId).text(value);
}

This function gets called each time a field needs to be changed. I've got between 2 and 40 different fields (dependant on the user) that are changed.

What is the best way of setting timers in order to change the values of the fields to '--' every 5 seconds, if no update has been made?

I would be really grateful for some tips, Thanks, Karol.

share|improve this question
    
Make an object which will hold the last time when field was updated. Probably in this way you will need only 1 timeout - this of the shortest period that has to be checked. Check the object, and if necessary update the fields. –  Bakudan Jul 18 '11 at 12:28
    
Or I don't understand your point, or what you need is a var, say handler = setInterval(setTo'--;, 5000);, and clear/set handler in every of changeValue call. Is it? Look you say "change the value of the field" and then say "change the values of the fields", so I don't know which one you need. –  Matías Marquez Jul 18 '11 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you want to indicate timeout on a per-field basis, you have two obvious options:

  1. Have a global interval timer that ticks over fairly frequently and looks through all of your fields for a timeout.
  2. Have independent timers for each field which just deal with that field.

I think on balance I prefer (1) to (2), because we're only dealing with one interval timer then and it makes the housekeeping simpler.

Since IDs in documents must be unique, we can use your field ID values as a key in a hash (an object) to store last updated times. This is kind of a spin on the previous answer but works on a per-field basis. So here's how we'd set those last updated times:

var lastUpdatedTimes = {};

function changeValue(data){
        var fieldId= data.fieldId;
        var value = Math.round(data.value);
        $('span#'+fieldId).text(value);
        lastUpdatedTimes[fieldId] = new Date().getTime();
}

Then you set up an interval timer to check each of them.

function checkFieldsForTimeout(){
        var now = new Date.getTime();

        // For each ID in lastUpdatedTimes, see if 'now minus
        // last updated' is > 5000 and is so, set the field
        // text to '--' and remove that entry from the last
        // updated list with "delete lastUpdatedTimes[itemId]".
}

Should a timed-out field spring back to life, the "--" will be replaced by some real text again.

By deleting the last updated time from "lastUpdatedTimes" whenever we put "--" into a field, we make sure that the interval timer isn't wasting time processing fields that have already been timed out.

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That worked great! Brilliant solution in its simplicity ;) Thanks a million! –  Klon Jul 18 '11 at 14:22
    
Is it necessary to delete lastUpdatedTimes[itemId]? If you do so, you need to check the existence first. –  Jiri Jul 18 '11 at 14:31
    
If you don't delete the entry, then next time around the interval timer it'll re-check the same entry, still think it has timed out and update its text with "--" again unnecessarily. It'd waste CPU time and might get really very slow updating fields over and over every interval tick if lots of fields timed out. You don't need to check for existence first when you use "delete" but in any case, it must exist, because you're deleting it from a loop iterating over the properties of the object... –  Andrew Hodgkinson Aug 5 '11 at 15:12
    
...and if you're worried that the JS engine may not enumerate all properties properly if items are deleted, then (1) you might not care since the interval timer will run again soon anyway, or (2) you could set the entry in "lastUpdatedTimes" to 'null' or some other magic no-op value and check for that inside your checkFieldsForTimeout property enumeration loop. (2) seems pretty ugly to me, especially given (1). –  Andrew Hodgkinson Aug 5 '11 at 15:15

This answer was extended to handling multiple fields after the comment by @Andrew (please see also his answer).

Introduce a property updatedTime, which holds the last time the data was updated, in each data. A periodic timer checks updatedTime for all data and updates the text field if appropriate. The check has to be twice as often as the detection period. Your function changeValue() updates updatedTime and the text field.

function checkData() {
    var now = new Date.getTime();
    for "each data" {
        if (now - data.updatedTime >= 5000) {
            var fieldId = data.fieldId;                      
            $('span#'+fieldId).text('--');
        }            
    }
}
function changeValue(data) {              
     var fieldId = data.fieldId;              
     var value = Math.round(data.value);              
     $('span#'+fieldId).text(value);
     data.updatedTime = new Date.getTime();      
}
// Install periodic timer to check last updates:
setInterval(checkData, 5000 / 2);   // interval = half the required detection period  
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think that works, even ignoring the problem of 'data' not being available inside 'checkData()'. The OP seems to be asking for timeouts for individual fields. In your case, one of the fields might not be updated for ten minutes, but so long as any other field was being updated every second, your global update timer would be constantly changing. Nothing in the code would ever go back to that first stalled field and update its value to indicate a field-specific timeout. –  Andrew Hodgkinson Jul 18 '11 at 13:28
    
Yes you right. My answer handled only one data (I did not realized that multiple data were required). The extension to multiple data is of course straightforward. I upvoted your answer and your comment. Thank your for your comment! –  Jiri Jul 18 '11 at 14:21

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