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My scenario - I am trying to send a Assembly File from Server to Client (via direct TCP connection). But the major problem is- how do I convert this Assembly to bytes to that it can be readily transferred? I used following -

 byte[] dllAsArray;
        using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            BinaryFormatter formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
            formatter.Serialize(stream,loCompiled.CompiledAssembly);
            dllAsArray = stream.ToArray();
        }

But when I use -

Assembly assembly = Assembly.Load(dllAsArray);

I get an exception -

Could not load file or assembly '165 bytes loaded from Code generator server, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null' or one of its dependencies. An attempt was made to load a program with an incorrect format. Please help!!!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Wouldn't that just be the raw dll contents, as though you had saved it to disk? i.e. the equivalent of File.ReadAllBytes?

It sounds like the dll is generated - can you save it anywhere? (temp area, memory stream, etc)?

edit Since it seems you are using code-dom, try using PathToAssembly (on the compiler-results) and File.ReadAllBytes (or a similar streaming mechanism).

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Simply load the File via ReadAllBytes and write via WriteAllBytes. The byte[] could be transfered over the network.

// Transfer to byte[]
byte[] data = System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(@"C:\ClassLibaryOne.dll");

// Write to file again
File.WriteAllBytes(@"C:\ClassLibaryOne.dll", data);

edit: If you use an AssemblyBuilder to create your dll, you can use .Save(fileName) to persist it to you harddrive before.

AssemblyBuilder a = ...
a.Save("C:\ClassLibaryTwo.dll);
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