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I have implemented a tool that analyses the c# source code and detects the design patterns. I tried to verify the tool with few test cases and it worked fine. I want to find the number of false positives and false negatives while detecting the design patterns.

So to further evaluate the tool I am searching for few existing open source projects with the statistics of design patterns implemented in it. Statistics like..

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I can compare the results of the tool with these statistics given with the project. This will help me to know the number of design pattern my tool can find, out of the already given number.

It would be helpful if I get few links to such projects.

Thanks in Advance.

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closed as not a real question by Oded, Jamie Dixon, Henk Holterman, C. A. McCann, Jarrod Roberson Jul 18 '11 at 20:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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what is the reason of downvoting here ? –  Tigran Jul 18 '11 at 13:25
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2 Answers

I think code is not the best source of information about design patterns, because its contradict a little bit from the original idea.

Design patterns is only direction (or idea) but not reusable components, otherwise we'll have whole bunch of libraries called DotNetGoF.dll with all GoF patterns in it. More over in all real-word application all patterns could be hidden by inherited complexity of business domain. If you take a look at all samples in all programming books you'll notice that all those samples is much simpler than real-world application with a tons of error handling logic etc.

I think you need to take a look at good book or another resource, for example "Design Patterns in C#" by Steven John Metsker or DotFactory.

EDIT: you can use .net framework source code as great source of design patterns. .Net framework contains Singletons, Factory Methods, Abstract Factory, Builder, Decorator, Strategy and many other GoF Patterns in it.

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I have a static code analysis approach where I analyze the source code to detect the patterns in the code...so I need few projects to check the correctness. And to have an idea of the false positives and false negatives. –  Vinod Menezes Jul 18 '11 at 13:36
    
First of all its not clear from you question what are you going to achieve. I suggest you update your question to state your question more clearly. Second, I think its very hard to find non-trivial patterns by analyzing source code. For example, its pretty simple to find Singleton, Factory Method or Builder, but its almost impossible to find Adapter, Bridge or Chains of Responsibility in complex application. More over its unclear why do you need it? I think more useful to use something like FX Cop for checking .net related untipatterns rather than find GoF patterns in your source doe. –  Sergey Teplyakov Jul 18 '11 at 13:46
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If I understand correctly, you're searching for code bases that contain design patterns to see if your analysis tool will detect the design patterns in the code. If that is right could you try the sample code from design pattern books such as this -

http://examples.oreilly.com/9780596527730/

Also, it's been a while but I seem to remember that the code base for sharp develop contains a number of design patterns, and there's a book describing how the program is put together so you could always cross reference that to see if your tool was finding the correct bits -

http://sharpdevelop.net/opensource/sd/

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