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I'd like to know on C# how to check if a string is a number (and just a number).

Example :

141241   Yes
232a23   No
12412a   No

and so on...

Is there a specific function?

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Depends what you mean by "number". A string containing only digits? An acceptably parseable int/long/float/double? Something else? –  dlev Jul 18 '11 at 13:32
    
by number you mean integer or non negative integer or are decimal fractions allowed too? And what about scientific notation? –  CodesInChaos Jul 18 '11 at 13:33
    
what about leading zero? i.e. "0123" is int or not? –  Nika G. Jul 18 '11 at 13:42
    
What about 1.2 and 1,2 are both legal or illegal? What about 1e3? What about -2? What about 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 18 '11 at 14:22
    
1.2 , 1,2 , -2, 88888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888, all are number, so I need to return true :) –  markzzz Jul 18 '11 at 14:30

18 Answers 18

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Look up double.TryParse() if you're talking about numbers like 1, -2 and 3.14159. Some others are suggesting int.TryParse(), but that will fail on decimals.

double num;
string candidate = "1";
if (double.TryParse(candidate, out num))
{
    // It's a number!
}

EDIT: As Lukas points out below, we should be mindful of the thread culture when parsing numbers with a decimal separator, i.e. do this to be safe:

double.TryParse(candidate, NumberStyles.AllowDecimalPoint, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out num)

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please always use InvariantCulture while parsing strings –  lukas Jan 7 '12 at 1:55
    
That's interesting, is that to deal with commas signifying decimal point? –  James McCormack Jan 9 '12 at 9:47
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/6428670/… yep –  lukas Jan 9 '12 at 10:35

If you just want to check if a string is all digits (without being within a particular number range) you can use:

string test = "123";
bool allDigits = test.All(char.IsDigit);
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Amazing. I don't understand why this isn't higher. –  eth0 Mar 20 '14 at 16:21

Use Int32.TryParse()

int num;

bool isNum = Int32.TryParse("[string to test]", out num);

if (isNum)
{
    //Is a Number
}
else
{
    //Not a number
}

MSDN Reference

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Yes there is

int temp;
int.TryParse("141241", out temp) = true
int.TryParse("232a23", out temp) = false
int.TryParse("12412a", out temp) = false

Hope this helps.

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Use int.TryParse():

string input = "141241";
int ouput;
bool result = int.TryParse(input, out output);

result will be true if it was.

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int value;
if (int.TryParse("your string", out value))
{
    Console.WriteLine(value);
}
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Perhaps you're looking for the int.TryParse function.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.int32.tryparse.aspx

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Yep - you can use the Visual Basic one in C#.It's all .NET; the VB functions IsNumeric, IsDate, etc are actually static methods of the Information class. So here's your code:

using Microsoft.VisualBasic;
...
Information.IsNumeric( object );
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The question is clearly tagged as C#. –  Ash Burlaczenko Jul 18 '11 at 13:41
3  
Dude I just gave C# code for using something in the VisualBasic namespace. Read the post and code! –  Joshua Honig Jul 18 '11 at 13:43
    
IsNumeric is essentially a wrapper for double.TryParse –  James McCormack Jul 18 '11 at 13:51
    
Interesting. However, IsNumeric is slightly more generous. This may or may not be what the poster is looking for, but it is worth noting. For examlple, IsNumeric will return true for a string with currency symbols (such as "$ 5,423.231"), but double.TryParse will return false for the same string. –  Joshua Honig Jul 18 '11 at 14:21

Many datatypes have a TryParse-method that will return true if it managed to successfully convert to that specific type, with the parsed value as an out-parameter.

In your case these might be of interest:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.int32.tryparse.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.decimal.tryparse.aspx

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int result = 0;
bool isValidInt = int.TryParse("1234", out result);
//isValidInt should be true
//result is the integer 1234

Of course, you can check against other number types, like decimal or double.

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You should use the TryParse method for the int

string text1 = "x";
    int num1;
    bool res = int.TryParse(text1, out num1);
    if (res == false)
    {
        // String is not a number.
    }
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If you want to validate if each character is a digit and also return the character that is not a digit as part of the error message validation, then you can loop through each char.

string num = "123x";

foreach (char c in num.ToArray())
{
    if (!Char.IsDigit(c))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("character " + c + " is not a number");
        return;
    }
}
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int.TryPasrse() Methode is the best way so if the value was string you will never have an exception , instead of the TryParse Methode return to you bool value so you will know if the parse operation succeeded or failed

string yourText = "2";
int num;
bool res = int.TryParse(yourText, out num);
if (res == true)
{
    // the operation succeeded and you got the number in num parameter
}
else
{
   // the operation failed
}
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string str = "123";
int i = Int.Parse(str);

If str is a valid integer string then it will be converted to integer and stored in i other wise Exception occur.

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You could use something like the following code:

    string numbers = "numbers you want to check";

    Regex regex = new Regex("^[0-9]+$"));

    if (regex.IsMatch(numbers))
    {
        //string value is a number
    }
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\d is better than [0-9]. Regex is probably less performant than TryParse() here. –  James McCormack Jul 18 '11 at 13:44
public static void Main()
        {
            string id = "141241";
            string id1 = "232a23";
            string id2 = "12412a";

            validation( id,  id1,  id2);
        }

       public static void validation(params object[] list)
        {
            string s = "";
            int result;
            string _Msg = "";

            for (int i = 0; i < list.Length; i++)
            {
                s = (list[i].ToString());

               if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
               {
                   _Msg = "Please Enter the value"; 
               }

               if (int.TryParse(s, out result))
               {
                   _Msg = "Enter  " + s.ToString() + ", value is Integer";

               }
               else
               {
                   _Msg = "This is not Integer value ";
               }
            }
        }
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Try This

here i perform addition of no and concatenation of string

 private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            bool chk,chk1;
            int chkq;
            chk = int.TryParse(textBox1.Text, out chkq);
            chk1 = int.TryParse(textBox2.Text, out chkq);
            if (chk1 && chk)
            {
                double a = Convert.ToDouble(textBox1.Text);
                double b = Convert.ToDouble(textBox2.Text);
                double c = a + b;
                textBox3.Text = Convert.ToString(c);
            }
            else
            {
                string f, d,s;
                f = textBox1.Text;
                d = textBox2.Text;
                s = f + d;
                textBox3.Text = s;
            }
        }
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I'm not a programmer of particularly high skills, but when I needed to solve this, I chose what is probably a very non-elegant solution, but it suits my needs.

    private bool IsValidNumber(string _checkString, string _checkType)
    {
        float _checkF;
        int _checkI;
        bool _result = false;

        switch (_checkType)
        {
            case "int":
                _result = int.TryParse(_checkString, out _checkI);
                break;
            case "float":
                _result = Single.TryParse(_checkString, out _checkF);
                break;
        }
        return _result;

    }

I simply call this with something like:

if (IsValidNumber("1.2", "float")) etc...

It means that I can get a simple true/false answer back during If... Then comparisons, and that was the important factor for me. If I need to check for other types, then I add a variable, and a case statement as required.

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