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I have a "threader" class that is throwing off threads that execute processes. The threads have a callback method in the threader class that get's called when they finish. My question is how do I know when all the threads the threader has thrown off have finished?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you keep a count of how many threads you've started you can simply increment the count when the thread starts and decrement it when the thread finishes.

Then when the count hits zero you know that all the threads have finished.

You need to take care when dealing with shortlived threads to make sure that you allow the counter to be incremented before it's decremented. Using some sort of locking or Interlocked.Increment and Decrement to modify the counter variable is needed. Source

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1  
That's what I was looking for. Sorry my brain isn't working this morning :) –  Joey Gfd Jul 18 '11 at 13:51
    
If a thread is short lived, the count may reach 0 before all the threads are started. –  Jonathan van de Veen Jul 18 '11 at 13:51
    
Make sure to use Interlocked.Increment/Decrement when modifying the counter variable... –  BFree Jul 18 '11 at 13:52
    
This will fail in case of a short lived thread, or even in case of an unexpected thread prioritizing. –  Neowizard Jul 18 '11 at 13:56
    
@Neowizard - see my update about short lived threads. –  ChrisF Jul 18 '11 at 13:57

You could keep a simple counter for the number of threads active. Or you could have the threads register (add) themselves in a collection before they begin their work and remove when done.

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Counting works, but may be harder to implement than you think... Be sure to do the decrement in a finally block within the thread and synchronize (lock) access to the counter (I know, it should be atomic, but nevertheless...).

If you create just some threads and have the thread instances anyway you could also Thread.Join each instance. This works, even if a thread has terminated before you call join (but still before the instance has been cleaned up).

So:

foreach( Thread thread in myThreads)
{
   thread.join();
}

once this completes, you are sure that all your threads have completed.

hth

Mario

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the simplest way is if you know in advance the number of threads that will be running, you can use a counter in the callback function.

In case you don't know the number of threads, then you need some "end-of-processing" indicator to set a boolean together with counters for created and ended threads.

If you don't know the number of threads that will be created, a simple two counters idea won't work (what if the first thread starts and finishes before any other thread is created, it'll falsely think that it was the last one).

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In the threader thread check the status of each thread. if all threads are stopped (or aborted) you know you can end the main thread.

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You can use WaitHandles. If you use BeginInvoke/EndInvoke to control your threads this becomes even more attractive (as IAsyncResult comes with a WaitHandle). Just remember to not surpass the OS limit of more than 64 items during a WaitAll call. Here is an extension method to make the process simpler:

static class ThreadingExtensions
{
    // Possible:
    // [ThreadStatic]
    // private static List<WaitHandle> PerThreadWaitList;
    public const int MaxHandlesPerWait = 64;

    public static void WaitAll<T>(this IEnumerable<T> handles, int millisecondsTimeout, int estimatedCount)
        where T : WaitHandle
    {
        // Possible:
        // var currentSet = PerThreadWaitList ?? (PerThreadWaitList = new List<WaitHandle>(estimatedCount));
        var currentSet = new List<WaitHandle>(Math.Min(estimatedCount, MaxHandlesPerWait));
        var timeoutEnd = Environment.TickCount + millisecondsTimeout;
        int timeout;

        // Wait for items in groups of 64.
        foreach (var item in handles)
        {
            currentSet.Add(item);
            if (currentSet.Count == MaxHandlesPerWait)
            {
                timeout = Timeout.Infinite;
                if (millisecondsTimeout >= 0)
                {
                    timeout = timeoutEnd - Environment.TickCount;
                    if (timeout < 0)
                        throw new TimeoutException();
                }
                WaitHandle.WaitAll(currentSet.ToArray(), timeout);
                currentSet.Clear();
            }
        }

        // Do the last set.
        if (currentSet.Count > 0)
        {
            timeout = Timeout.Infinite;
            if (millisecondsTimeout >= 0)
            {
                timeout = timeoutEnd - Environment.TickCount;
                if (timeout < 0)
                    timeout = 0;
            }
            WaitHandle.WaitAll(currentSet.ToArray(), timeout);
            currentSet.Clear();
        }
    }
}

And an example of usage.

var results = new List<IAsyncResult>();
// Call delegates, e.g.
// results.Add(Foo.BeginInvoke(OnEndInvokeFoo));
results.Select(x => x.AsyncWaitHandle).WaitAll(Timeout.Infinite, results.Count);
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The sample code of the thread counter

long counter = 0;

void ThreadEntryPoint()
{
  try
  {
    ...
    //
  }
  finally
  {
    // Decrement counter
    Interlocked.Decrement(ref counter);
  }
}

void MainThread()
{
  // Start worers
  for(...)
  {
    // Increment threads couter
    Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
    ((Action)ThreadEntryPoint).BeginInvoke(null, null);
  }

  // Wait until counter is equal to 0
  while(Interlocked.Read(ref counter) != 0)
  {
    Thread.Sleep(0);
  }
}
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