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Operator overloading

EDIT 2

I was using insert(...) incorrectly, I didn't actually need a '=' operator. Sorry to waste peoples' time. I have voted to close.. 2 votes remain. Please vote.

EDIT

The reason I want an '=' operator is so I can use the insert(...) function on a vector of Derivation objects. At the moment my compiler says:

/usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/stl_algobase.h:283: error: no match for 'operator=' in '* __result = * __first'

I have created '==' and '<' operators for my own classes before but I'm struggling to create an '=' operator. My class looks like this (ignore the silly variable names):

class Derivation {
public:
    string                  rc; 
    ImplementationChoice    Y; 
    vector<Derivation>      X;
    vector<string>          D;       
    vector<string>          C;       
    vector<Player>          P, O;   
    vector<Attack>          B;   

    // various functions
    // ...
};

and I want to know what I need to put in

// What do '=' return?  An object of the class right?
Derivation& operator=(const Derivation &d) const {
    // something....
}

Many thanks.

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marked as duplicate by R. Martinho Fernandes, Armen Tsirunyan, ale, Evan Teran, Robᵩ Jul 18 '11 at 14:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
At the very least, it should return a reference (Derivation&) rather than a new copy of the object. :) –  jalf Jul 18 '11 at 14:00
    
Thank you.. editing post now. Sorry.. pretty new to C++ –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:01
2  
I recommend you read the operator overloading faq. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 18 '11 at 14:03
    
If ImplementationChoice already provides an operator= it's likely that an appropriate Derivation::operator= has already been implicitly declared. (Not putting in an answer since it doesn't really address your questions, just putting this as a heads up.) –  Luc Danton Jul 18 '11 at 14:06

7 Answers 7

First, an assignment operator probably should not be const--

Second, assignment operators usually return a non-const reference to the object that was assigned a value (*this)

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You don't need one. The compiler-generated one will do just fine.

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That depends on how are implemented ImplementationChoice, Player and Attack... –  rolo Jul 18 '11 at 14:10
    
really? there are five vectors in this struct... –  Nim Jul 18 '11 at 14:11
    
Please so EDIT in post. I need the '=' operator so I can use insert(...) on a vector of Derivation objects. It doesn't compile without one. It says /usr/include/c++/4.2.1/bits/stl_algobase.h:283: error: no match for 'operator=' in '* __result = * __first' –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:12

first remove the const ... then if you really need a copy operator, do something like that and add your own logic (so that it doesn't do just exactly what would be done with the compiler generated copy operator) :

Derivation& operator=(const Derivation& other) {
    this->rc = other.rc; 
    this->Y = other.Y; 
    this->X = other.X;
    this->D = other.D;       
    this->C = other.C;       
    this->P = other.P;
    this->O = other.O;   
    this->B = other.B;
    // ...
    return *this;
}  
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2  
Except that this is exactly what the compiler-generated copy-assignment operator does... –  Armen Tsirunyan Jul 18 '11 at 14:07
    
@Armen - really? I didn't realise that the compiler generated assignment operator calls the assignment for the vector members too? –  Nim Jul 18 '11 at 14:12

This is up to you, really. What do you need the operator to do? Do you want to return a reference, or do you want a copy?

EDIT: Please note that this was rhetorical. What you use this vector for will determine if you need a reference or a copy. For example, if the object your inserting is at any point going to go out of scope before being removed from the vector, you'll want a copy. If not, and you want the original object to be effected when you change the instance in the vector, you'll want a reference. Hope that helps a bit.

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Please so EDIT in post. I need the '=' operator so I can use insert(...) on a vector of Derivation objects –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:12
    
...I'm sorry, what? –  MGZero Jul 18 '11 at 14:16
    
I want to be able to do this: vector<Derivation> d; d.insert(d.end(), vec.begin(), vec.end()); –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:17
    
See edit in answer. –  MGZero Jul 18 '11 at 14:24
    
From you edit and looking at what I want to do, I believe it is a reference that I need. Thank you. –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:29

The standard way to implement an assignment operator is copy-and-swap. This has the advantages of being the most simple way to make an assignment operator that is correct in the face of exceptions and self-assignment. It also defines the assignment operation in terms of the copy-constructor, thus reducing the number of places where your code needs to be changed if you add extra members to the class.

Anyway - here is what it looks like in your case:

class Derivation {
    public:
    string                  rc; 
    ImplementationChoice    Y; 
    vector<Derivation>      X;
    vector<string>          D;       
    vector<string>          C;       
    vector<Player>          P, O;   
    vector<Attack>          B;   

    //You need to add a swap function to your class
    void swap(Derivation& o) {
        rc.swap(o.rc);
        Y.swap(o.Y);//Assuming ImplementationChoice has a swap function (it should!)
        X.swap(o.X);
        D.swap(o.D);
        C.swap(o.C);
        P.swap(o.P);
        O.swap(o.O);
        B.swap(o.B);
    }
    Derivation& operator=(Derivation const& o) {
        Derivation copy(o);
        copy.swap(*this);
        return *this;
    }
    // various functions
    // ...
};
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Thank you Mankarse. Did you see my EDIT in my post? Is this what I need if I want to use the vector insert(...) function on a vector of my Derivation objects? Thanks. –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:16
    
@alemaster - No, the insert function will use the copy-constructor to insert the Derivation objects into the vector. The compiler-generated copy-constructor should be fine for this class. –  Mankarse Jul 18 '11 at 14:19

to overload assignment operator you should do this

Derivation& operator=(const Derivation &d)  {
    // something....
   return *this
}

This will allow you to do something like.

Deviation a, b, c; //something

c = b = a;

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I don't think it should be a const method as you're changing the state of the object (assigning it the value of d). It's probably legal C++ but doesn't really make sense. –  Skizz Jul 18 '11 at 14:03
    
@Martinho and @Skizz. thank, i have edited –  Leon Jul 18 '11 at 14:04
    
Thank you.. I basically had the single argument parameter (const Derivation &d) from pasting from a '<' operator elsewhere in my code. I can remove that right? Thanks. –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:07
    
@alemaster remove what. I dont quite understand –  Leon Jul 18 '11 at 14:10
    
@Leon - ignore me! I have only just realised the '=' must have exactly one argument. I tried removing const Derivation &d but the compiler complained. –  ale Jul 18 '11 at 14:14

Since - @jalf has not put up an answer, here it is :)

Derivation& operator=(const Derivation &d) {
  // something....
  return *this;
}

You need to return a reference to this instance. this is a keyword which holds a pointer to the instance on which the operator is acting.

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