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What is the best practice for using Builder pattern in "deep" object hierarchies? To elaborate, I explored the idea of applying the Builder pattern as proposed by Joshua Bloch, to my XML binding code (I am using SimpleXML but this question would apply to any case). My object hierarchy is 4 levels deep, with various degree of complexity. By that, I mean, in some levels I have just a couple of properties for my objects, whereas at some other levels I have up to 10.

So consider this hypothetical example (I am leaving out the Simple XML annotations for brevity)

public class Outermost {

    private String title;
    private int channel;
    private List<Middle> middleList;

}

class Middle{
    private int id;
    private String name;
    private boolean senior;
    /* ... ... 10 such properties */

    private Innermost inner;
}

class Innermost{
    private String something;
    private int foo;
    /* ... Few more of these ..*/
}

If I wanted to enforce creation of the Outermost object using builders, what would be the best way to go about it? The most obvious answer is to have inner static Builder classes for each of the above classes.

But, wouldn't that make things as unwieldy as the very problem Builder pattern tries to solve? I am thinking about stuff like - this will enforce an "inside out" approach - meaning that the Innermost object will have to be fully constructed and instantiated before it can be added to the Middle object. But we all know that in practice (especially when one is building XML or JSON), we rarely have "timely" information to accomplish this.

Chances are, one will end up having variables for each and every property - across all levels; and create the objects in the very end. OR, one will end up having Builder for multiple levels floating around in the code, adding to the confusion.

So, any ideas on how to elegantly accomplish this?

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IMHO If you're using the builder pattern you should make all those private fields final. –  Adam Gent Mar 21 '13 at 0:13
    
@AdamGent Thanks for pointing that out. They are indeed final in my app. Somehow missed that while posting the question here. –  curioustechizen Mar 21 '13 at 5:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The description of the Builder Pattern here is I guess what you are referring to; it's a .little different than the pattern described in Wikipedia here, I prefer the former.

I don't see that your concerns about order of construction or loss of encapsulation inevitable follow from the descriptions I read. For me the big question is the structure of your raw data.

Suppose we have

 public OuterBuilder {
     // some outer attributes here

     private ArrayList<MiddleBuilder> m_middleList;

     public OuterBuild( mandatory params for Outers ){
          // populate some outer attributes
          // create empty middle array
     }

     public addMiddle(MiddleBuilder middler) {
              m_middleList.add(middler);
     } 
 }

Now we can create as many middleBuilders as we need

 while (middleDataIter.hasNext() ) {
      MiddleData data = middleDateIter.next();
      // make a middle builder, add it.
 }

We can apply the same pattern to the further levels of nesting.

To address your first point, a variable for every property: depends on how we design the builders and where our data is coming from. If we're, say coming from a UI then we pretty much have a variable per property anyway, we're no worse off. If as per my suggestion above we're iterating some data structure, then maybe the builder takes responsibility for iterpreting that data structure. In my example we pass MiddleData instances down. Some extra coupling but it does encapsulate the details.

To address your second point we don't build things as we go, instead we're effectively using the builder as the accumulation point for the data. Eventually we call the "Go and Build" method, but at that point we should have all the data in place so the whole hierarchy just builds.

share|improve this answer
    
That was detailed and that was quick! Well, I do refer to the former description of Builder as you pointed out. But I'm not sure I understand what you are suggesting here. Are you saying I have a hierarchy of Builder objects which parallels my class hierarchy? Maybe the answer to that will help me understand why you think the "Go and Build" does not need to be inside-out. –  curioustechizen Jul 18 '11 at 15:52
1  
yes, I'm thinking in terms of the Outer Builder knowing about Middle Builders and Middle Builders knowing about Inner Builders. I thought your concern what that we might receive the data in some order which would not allow us to build Outside-In. So for data intepretation I'm claiming that we can build the builders in any order we please, most likely outside in, and accumulate data in the builders as we wish. At some point we have all we need and at that point tell the Outer to start building, which in turn recursively works its way inwards. So likely the innermost objects do get build first. –  djna Jul 18 '11 at 16:41
    
Yes - I see your point now. I will try this approach and update my findings here. –  curioustechizen Jul 18 '11 at 17:09

It can be done, but it's arguably not worth doing. The obvious implementation...

class Shape
{
    private final double opacity;

    public double getOpacity()
    {
        return opacity;
    }

    public static abstract class Builder<T extends Shape> {

        private double opacity;

        public Builder<T> opacity(double opacity) {
            this.opacity = opacity;
            return this;
        }

        public abstract T build();
    }

    public static Builder<?> builder() {
        return new Builder<Shape>()
            {
                @Override
                    public Shape build()
                {
                    return new Shape(this);
                }
            };
    }

    protected Shape(Builder<?> builder) {
        this.opacity = builder.opacity;
    }
}

class Rectangle extends Shape {

    private final double height;
    private final double width;

    public double getHeight()
    {
        return height;
    }

    public double getWidth()
    {
        return width;
    }

    public static abstract class Builder<T extends Rectangle> extends Shape.Builder<T> {
        private double height;
        private double width;

        public Builder<T> height(double height) {
            this.height = height;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder<T> width(double width) {
            this.width = width;
            return this;
        }
    }

    public static Builder<?> builder() {
        return new Builder<Rectangle>()
            {
                @Override
                    public Rectangle build()
                {
                    return new Rectangle(this);
                }
            };
    }

    protected Rectangle(Builder<?> builder) {
        super(builder);
        this.height = builder.height;
        this.width = builder.width;
    }
}

...quickly runs into a problem. If you try something like

Rectangle r = Rectangle.builder().opacity(0.5).height(50).width(100).build();

it's not going to compile, because opacity() doesn't know it's returning a Rectangle.Builder, just a Shape.Builder<Rectangle>. So you have to call the attributes in order, from most-derived to least-derived:

Rectangle r = Rectangle.builder().height(50).width(100).opacity(0.5).build();

If you want to get around this, you need to make the attribute methods generic, so that the superclass methods will still return the subclass builders. There's no way AFAIK to make this 100% reliable, but with some self-referential generics you can get close:

class Shape
{
    private final double opacity;

    public double getOpacity ()
    {
        return opacity;
    }

    public static abstract class ShapeBuilder<S extends Shape, B extends ShapeBuilder<S, B>>
    {

        private double opacity;

        @SuppressWarnings( "unchecked" )
        public B opacity ( double opacity )
        {
            this.opacity = opacity;
            return (B) this;
        }

        public abstract S build ();
    }

    private static class DefaultShapeBuilder extends ShapeBuilder<Shape, DefaultShapeBuilder>
    {
        @Override
        public Shape build ()
        {
            return new Shape( this );
        }
    }

    public static ShapeBuilder<?, ?> builder ()
    {
        return new DefaultShapeBuilder();
    }

    protected Shape ( ShapeBuilder<?, ?> builder )
    {
        this.opacity = builder.opacity;
    }
}

class Rectangle extends Shape
{

    private final double height;
    private final double width;

    public double getHeight ()
    {
        return height;
    }

    public double getWidth ()
    {
        return width;
    }

    public static abstract class RectangleBuilder<S extends Rectangle, B extends RectangleBuilder<S, B>> extends ShapeBuilder<S, B>
    {
        private double height;
        private double width;

        @SuppressWarnings( "unchecked" )
        public B height ( double height )
        {
            this.height = height;
            return (B) this;
        }

        @SuppressWarnings( "unchecked" )
        public B width ( double width )
        {
            this.width = width;
            return (B) this;
        }
    }

    public static RectangleBuilder<?, ?> builder ()
    {
        return new DefaultRectangleBuilder();
    }

    protected Rectangle ( RectangleBuilder<?, ?> builder )
    {
        super( builder );
        this.height = builder.height;
        this.width = builder.width;
    }

    private static class DefaultRectangleBuilder extends RectangleBuilder<Rectangle, DefaultRectangleBuilder>
    {
        @Override
        public Rectangle build ()
        {
            return new Rectangle( this );
        }
    }
}

class RotatedRectangle extends Rectangle
{
    private final double theta;

    public double getTheta ()
    {
        return theta;
    }

    public static abstract class RotatedRectangleBuilder<S extends RotatedRectangle, B extends RotatedRectangleBuilder<S, B>> extends Rectangle.RectangleBuilder<S, B>
    {
        private double theta;

        @SuppressWarnings( "Unchecked" )
        public B theta ( double theta )
        {
            this.theta = theta;
            return (B) this;
        }
    }

    public static RotatedRectangleBuilder<?, ?> builder ()
    {
        return new DefaultRotatedRectangleBuilder();
    }

    protected RotatedRectangle ( RotatedRectangleBuilder<?, ?> builder )
    {
        super( builder );
        this.theta = builder.theta;
    }

    private static class DefaultRotatedRectangleBuilder extends RotatedRectangleBuilder<RotatedRectangle, DefaultRotatedRectangleBuilder>
    {
        @Override
        public RotatedRectangle build ()
        {
            return new RotatedRectangle( this );
        }
    }
}

class BuilderTest
{
    public static void main ( String[] args )
    {
        RotatedRectangle rotatedRectangle = RotatedRectangle.builder()
                .theta( Math.PI / 2 )
                .width( 640 )
                .height( 400 )
                .height( 400 )
                .opacity( 0.5d ) // note attribs can be set in any order
                .width( 111 )
                .opacity( 0.5d )
                .width( 222 )
                .height( 400 )
                .width( 640 )
                .width( 640 )
                .build();
        System.out.println( rotatedRectangle.getTheta() );
        System.out.println( rotatedRectangle.getWidth() );
        System.out.println( rotatedRectangle.getHeight() );
        System.out.println( rotatedRectangle.getOpacity() );
    }
}

Note the @SuppressWarnings annotations; if a subclass breaks the convention that FooBuilder always extends FooSuperclassBuilder<Foo, FooBuilder>, the system breaks down.

And you can see how ugly the code gets. At this point maybe it's better to abandon Item 2 and instead meditate on Item 16: Favor composition over inheritance.

share|improve this answer
1  
your answer was very informative - however, I think you misunderstood the original question. I was not looking to apply the Builder pattern to inheritance trees. Rather, the problem I was trying to solve was to apply the Builder pattern when an object is composed of other non-primitive fields. The example in the question illustrates this. –  curioustechizen Mar 21 '13 at 5:13

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