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Say I have a dict:

d = {
    'eggs': 4,
    'cheese': 6,
    'coconuts': 8,
}

Is is possible to loop over the dictionary, creating variables named after the keys, assigning them the corresponding value?

eggs = 4
cheese = 6
coconuts = 8

Or maybe inside an object?

self.eggs = 4
self.cheese = 6
self.coconuts = 8

Is this possible?

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1  
If you already have them in a dict, why do you need them as variables? Just curious. –  Jacob Jul 18 '11 at 15:47
1  
Possible? Yes. Advisable, acceptable, a good idea? Most propably no. Why would you want/need this? –  delnan Jul 18 '11 at 15:48
    
Explaining "why" is material for a separate question. Later today, possibly. So for now, please slap a huge "not-advisable" sticker on it, if you must, but I'd still like to know how. –  maligree Jul 18 '11 at 15:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
>>> d = {
...     'eggs': 4,
...     'cheese': 6,
...     'coconuts': 8,
... }
>>> globals().update(d)
>>> eggs
4
>>> cheese
6
>>> coconuts
8
>>> d
{'cheese': 6, 'eggs': 4, 'coconuts': 8}

But for classes, it is easier(safer), just use:

for item, value in d.items():
     setattr(some_object, item, value) #or self.setattr(item, value)
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1  
I used this method for a script in my job. This perl guy saw it and said "now I know you can write one line of python, and screw up the readability of an entire module" –  Simon Jul 18 '11 at 16:38

You could use Alex Martelli's Bunch class:

>>> class Bunch(object):
...     def __init__(self, **kwds):
...         self.__dict__.update(kwds)
...
>>> d = {
...     'eggs': 4,
...     'cheese': 6,
...     'coconuts': 8,
... }
>>> b = Bunch(**d)
>>> b.eggs
4
share|improve this answer

Use setattr:

d = {
    'eggs': 4,
    'cheese': 6,
    'coconuts': 8,
}

class Food: pass

food = Food()

for item in d.iteritems():
    setattr(food, *item)

print(food.eggs, food.cheese, food.coconuts)
share|improve this answer
    
setattr(food, *item) was interesting (+1). –  maligree Jul 18 '11 at 16:17

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