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I want to ask where in C++ is the right place to instantiate a instance-variables? I think it should not be in the class declaration, but otherwise I don`t see any disadvantages apart from poor object-oriented design:

class A{ member m; };

I think it should better be like:

class A{ extern member m; };

But I don`t know how to realize it without a pointer like this:

class A{ member* m };

A::A(){ m = new member; }

Is there a "clean solution" to realize this on the stack (without using pointers)?

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closed as not a real question by Nawaz, stijn, Bo Persson, Thomas Matthews, Graviton Jul 19 '11 at 4:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Why wouldn't you do it in the class? –  mjr Jul 18 '11 at 16:50
    
What are you trying to achieve? –  Nawaz Jul 18 '11 at 16:51
    
Could you please clarify the question? A field within an object is "instantiated" together with the object itself. Did you actually mean "class-level" or "static" member? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Jul 18 '11 at 16:53
    
I meant "class level" but my problem was that I thought an instance-variable is defined within the class declaration - sorry, my fault... –  Dudero Jul 19 '11 at 8:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use the constructor initialization list to construct all your member variables as you need.

A::A(const member& memberArg)
     : m(memberArg) 
{ }

Look at this for more info.

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you mean class A{ member m; }; and then member m;...A::A():m(m){} –  Dudero Jul 18 '11 at 16:55
2  
Better make the parameter const member &. –  Nawaz Jul 18 '11 at 16:55
    
yes, that is what I mean. An instance variable in C++ is exactly that: class A{ member m; }; –  sergio Jul 18 '11 at 16:56
    
@Nawaz: Thanks, Nawaz... –  sergio Jul 18 '11 at 16:56
    
Ok thanks, but what if I don`t have a member object for constructor initialization list from higher level - is there a chance to do this within class A (without new/pointer)? –  Dudero Jul 18 '11 at 17:02

You would declare your instance variables in your .h file:

A.h

class A {

   public:
      A();
   private:
      int value;
      double someOtherValue;
}

You can instantiate them in your .cpp file like so:

A.cpp

A::A(): value(5), someOtherValue(10.0)
{
   ...
}
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I think you have a misunderstanding of how objects are instantiated. If all you do is declare a class, no member variables are actually instantiated. It isn't until you construct an instance of that class that its member variables exist.

Here's an example to show when a member object gets instantiated:

class ClassA
{
public:
  ClassA() { std::cout << "Hello!\n"; }
};

class ClassB
{
public:
  ClassA objA;
};

int main()
{
  // do some work
  ClassB objB; // here, a ClassB object is created, and with it its member ClassA object, so "Hello!" is printed
  return 0;
}

As to exactly how you specify what kind of ClassA object to create if its constructor requires arguments, the other answers do a fine job explaining it.

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Thank you Sean, you are right, I had a misunderstanding of how objects in C++ are instantiated. –  Dudero Jul 19 '11 at 8:00

I think it should not be in the class declaration, but otherwise I don`t see any disadvantages apart from poor object-oriented design:

class A{ member m; };

What in your mind makes this poor OO design? This is the preferred mechanism in C++.

I think it should better be like:

class A{ extern member m; };

This isn't valid code. Qualifying member data with a storage class specification such as extern is illegal.

But I don`t know how to realize it without a pointer like this:

class A{ member* m; };
A::A(){ m = new member; }

That will work, but why do that? It looks to me like you are trying to import a Java POV into C++. Everything is allocated, and everything is a reference in Java. In many (most!) cases there is no reason to allocate data members in C++. All it does is add an unneeded indirection and add a place where memory can leak.

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You want to use member initializers: they are the only way to initialize class members that have a constructor that requires parameters, and the cleanest way to initialize other class members.

If you have class A and a member m with a constructor:

class A { member m; }

You want

class A { member m; A(); }

A::A()
: m(<constructor params>)
{
}
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If the member object is to be totally controlled by the enclosing A object, your first example is the proper way to do it. It does have the downside of requiring a complete definition of member at the point where A is defined.

You could check out the pimpl idiom to reduce coupling, but that still requires the object to be heap-based and not stack-based.

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