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This question concerns designing non-clustered indexes in SQL Server 2005.

I have a large table with several million lines. Rows are only ever read or inserted. Most operations are reads. I have been looking at the various SELECT queries that access the table with the objective of improving read access speed. Disk space isn't really an issue. (Each row has a unique ID, and I am using that as the single field in the clustered index.)

My question is, if a non-clustered index indexes more columns than are used by a query, does that translate into slower query execution than an index that exactly matches the query?

As the number of distinct queries increases, so does the number of permutations of columns used in their WHERE clauses. I'm unsure about the trade-offs between having many indexes with a small number of columns (one for each query) versus fewer indexes on more columns.

For example, say I have two SELECT queries. The first uses columns A, B, C, and D in its WHERE clause, and the second uses A, B, E, and F. Would best practice here be to define two indexes, one on A/B/C/D and the other on A/B/E/F; or a single index on A/B/C/D/E/F?

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Great question! This isn't really an answer, but Kimberly Tripp has written a number of brilliant articles on SQL indexing you might want to check out. Here's just one - sqlskills.com/blogs/kimberly/Default.aspx#p4 – Yuck Jul 18 '11 at 17:24

First things first, the order of columns in the indexes matter. So building/tuning your queries accordingly will allow you to make good use of indexes you built.

Whether having two indexes separately or one index depends on the dependencies of columns in contention and the kind of queries that are run. In your example if E and F columns relate to or depend on C and D columns then it makes sense to have one index covering all columns.

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Thanks for your answer! Two follow-on questions: 1. When you say that the order of the columns matters, do you mean the order in which the columns appear, or the sort order, or both? 2. When you say "if E and F columns relate to or depend on C and D", what kind of relationship is significant? The values in (say) C/D/E/F are independent of each other, but each column has duplicates. – Andy Johnson Jul 18 '11 at 18:03
    
1. Yes the order in which columns appear in your CREATE INDEX statement. Make sure your queries use same order in WHERE clause to take maximum benefit out of Index. 2. When I said relationship among fields, a simple example would be to find Jason Bourne, you would use an index that uses index that has LASTNAME, FIRSTNAME in the same order and then use query WHERE LASTNAME = 'Bourne' AND FIRSTNAME = 'Jason'. If you think about it using WHERE in reverse order than above will not be able to utilize index to full benefit. – Santosh Chandavaram Jul 18 '11 at 18:40
    
(...contd) Which order does columns go in index depends on the business. Imagine a city with 70% of people with last name BOURNE. Then it will actually makes sense to use index with columns FIRSTNAME, LASTNAME in the orser. – Santosh Chandavaram Jul 18 '11 at 18:40
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"If you think about it using WHERE in reverse order than above will not be able to utilize index to full benefit." This is not true. It does not matter what order you specify your WHERE conditions in. – srutzky Apr 15 '12 at 6:10

My question is, if a non-clustered index indexes more columns than are used by a query, does that translate into slower query execution than an index that exactly matches the query?

No, having more columns doesn't slow down the query time for queries that are using the first 1, 2, n columns in the index. That being said, if you are limited on memory the index loading into memory may push other things out of memory and slow down the query, but if you have plenty of memory this shouldn't be a problem.

As the number of distinct queries increases, so does the number of permutations of columns used in their WHERE clauses. I'm unsure about the trade-offs between having many indexes with a small number of columns (one for each query) versus fewer indexes on more columns.

You should add the most commonly queried unique fields into the indexes first. Fewer indexes with many columns may not give you what you want.

for instance if you have an index with the following columns:

  • ColumnA
  • ColumnB
  • ColumnC
  • ColumnD
  • ColumnE
  • ColumnF

in that order, queries filtering against ColumnA, ColumnB, ColumnC, ColumnD... will use the index, but if you are just querying against ColumnE or ColumnF it won't use the index.

Take a diffferent approach if you have six indexes on a single table each with just one column

  • Index1 - ColumnA
  • Index2 - ColumnB
  • Index3 - ColumnC
  • Index4 - ColumnD
  • Index5 - ColumnE
  • Index6 - ColumnF

in this case only one of those 6 indexes will get used for any query.

Also if you index contains a value that is not very selective, then it may not be helping you. For instance if you have a column called GENDER that may contain the following values (Male, Female, and Unknown) then it is probably not going to help you to include this column in the index. When the query is run SQL Server may determine that they column is not selective enough and just assume that a full table scan would be faster.

There are many ways to find out what indexes are being used by your query, but one approach that I use is to look at the indexes that are never used. Run the following query in your database and find out if the indexes that you think are being used are really being used.

SELECT iv.table_name, 
        i.name                           AS index_name, 
        iv.seeks + iv.scans + iv.lookups AS total_accesses, 
        iv.seeks, 
        iv.scans, 
        iv.lookups, 
        t.indextype, 
        t.indexsizemb 
FROM   (SELECT i.object_id, 
                Object_name(i.object_id) AS table_name, 
                i.index_id, 
                SUM(i.user_seeks)        AS seeks, 
                SUM(i.user_scans)        AS scans, 
                SUM(i.user_lookups)      AS lookups 
        FROM   sys.tables t 
                INNER JOIN sys.dm_db_index_usage_stats i 
                    ON t.object_id = i.object_id 
        GROUP  BY i.object_id, 
                    i.index_id) AS iv 
        INNER JOIN sys.indexes i 
            ON iv.object_id = i.object_id 
            AND iv.index_id = i.index_id 
        INNER JOIN (SELECT sys_schemas.name AS schemaname, 
                            sys_objects.name AS tablename, 
                            sys_indexes.name AS indexname , 
                            sys_indexes.type_desc AS indextype , 
    CAST(partition_stats.used_page_count * 8 / 1024.00 AS DECIMAL(10, 3)) AS indexsizemb 
FROM   sys.dm_db_partition_stats partition_stats 
INNER JOIN sys.indexes sys_indexes 
    ON partition_stats.[object_id] = sys_indexes.[object_id] 
        AND partition_stats.index_id = sys_indexes.index_id 
        AND sys_indexes.type_desc <> 'HEAP' 
INNER JOIN sys.objects sys_objects 
    ON sys_objects.[object_id] = partition_stats.[object_id] 
INNER JOIN sys.schemas sys_schemas 
    ON sys_objects.[schema_id] = sys_schemas.[schema_id] 
        AND sys_schemas.name <> 'SYS') AS t 
ON t.indexname = i.name 
AND t.tablename = iv.table_name 
--WHERE t.IndexSizeMB > 200 
WHERE  iv.seeks + iv.scans + iv.lookups = 0 
ORDER  BY total_accesses ASC; 

I generally track down indexes that have never been used, or have not been used several months after a SQL Server reboot, and determine if they should be deleted or not. Sometimes too many indexes can slow down SQL Server figuring out the best path to run a query, and deleting unused indexes can speed up that process.

I hope this helps make sense out of your indexes.

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The existing answers are already very good. Here is a new thought: Finding an optimal set of indexes under a certain workload and memory availability is a hard problem which requires exhaustive search of a big search space.

The Database Engine Tuning Advisor (DTA) implements just that! I recommend you record a representative workload (including writes!) and let the DTA give you suggestions. It will take disk space into account, too.

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Disk space isn't really an issue.

Please do not think this way. It does not matter if you have 500 GB of free space. The larger a table or index is, the more time it takes to read from disk AND the more space it takes in memory (i.e. the Buffer Pool) AND the more logical reads it will take to satisfy the query. For more details on this topic, look here: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/data-modeling/71725/

(Each row has a unique ID, and I am using that as the single field in the clustered index.)

Are most of your queries using that ID in a WHERE clause? If not then it might not be a good choice for the clustered index.

My question is, if a non-clustered index indexes more columns than are used by a query, does that translate into slower query execution than an index that exactly matches the query?

It depends on a few factors. How many more fields are you talking about? A single TINYINT field that is 1 byte? Or several fields making up 300 bytes? Unless you are using Filtered Indexes you need to multiply the size of your index plus the size of your clustered index (for non-UNIQUE indexes) by the number of rows. As I mentioned above, more space taken up does mean slower, but realistically a extra 5 MBs on a 100 MB probably won't have a noticeable difference.

Keep in mind that index design is both art and science. You need to factor in which queries will be executed most often and what ORDER BYs are used as well as the WHERE clauses. You need to keep in mind that an index will not be used if the leading column of it is not present in the query, even if the rest of the fields of the index are in the query.

Generally speaking, you do NOT want to index each field individually because:

  1. too many indexes slow down DML operations, which is an issue even if most operations are SELECT on this table
  2. too many indexes increases the chances of dead-locks
  3. a query asking for 4 fields is not going to use 4 separate indexes. most of the time the optimizer will choose the one that it feels will work the best and sometimes it might choose to join two of them together, especially if you have an OR condition

For example, say I have two SELECT queries. The first uses columns A, B, C, and D in its WHERE clause, and the second uses A, B, E, and F.

You might do best by indexing just A and B and seeing how that works out. If that combination is unique then consider it a possibility for a composite clustered index. If they are not unique but still used by most queries, consider making the clustered index: A, B, IDfield. Including the IDfield last gives the combination uniqueness. This is important because if your clustered index is not a Primary Key then you REALLY need to declare the clustered index as UNIQUE so it doesn't have the hidden uniqueifier field. A Primary Key is by definition unique.

Also look into the INCLUDE option for Indexes.

And yes, column order does matter as it determines how the index is organized. Think about the difference between having ActionDate, CustomerID vs CustomerID, ActionDate. If ActionDate is first then it is easier to find all CustomerIDs within a certain date range. But if you only care about one customer and want several different dates of their info, you would have to skip around that entire index as their data will be spread out across is. In that case you would be better off with CustomerID first as you can narrow down more quickly to where their data starts and then just grab the data you want based on the dates.

But no, the order of your WHERE condition does NOT have a bearing on whether or not an index will be used. SQL Server uses a cost-based optimizer that scans all conditions and uses statistics of the indexes (the leading column) to determine what the most appropriate plan should be.

Lastly, be sure to TEST various strategies. Do not just try one thing and move on. You were very general in your description -- not even giving datatypes for the fields or how the fields are being used -- so any recommendation here that is highly specific is questionable. Use SET STATISTICS IO ON and look for Logical Reads. The lower that number gets the better!

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