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I have a page that uses jQuery and a little bit of jQuery UI and displays a wizard of a 7 page long questionnaire. Each section of the wizard is essentially a div that is later displayed when the user goes on the respective page.

I feel like the load time for the site is slow, and was thinking if its an option to delay the loading of the 6 pages that follow the first page, just because its at least a few seconds before the user goes on to the next page. I am not using jQuery tabs, but a custom wizard plugin.

Thanks!

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Yes, that is an option. Do you have a more specific question with which we can assist? –  George Cummins Jul 18 '11 at 17:36
    
yes - what is the best way to achieve this? I have 7 divs, each containing the page, and all divs are on that main page. I'd like to delay the loading of the divs so that the main page loads faster, what is the best way to do this? –  Raiders Jul 18 '11 at 17:44

2 Answers 2

setTimeout(function(){
  $('#secondTab').ajax('your-url-for-the-second-tab');
},2000);
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so its better to take out the other div's html and stick it in another page that is returned by ajax? –  Raiders Jul 18 '11 at 17:45

If you want to delay the loading of subsequent divs, then you will have to remove them from the main page and then dynamically load as needed them with ajax calls. This will require changes on both client (to write the ajax call to load the subsequent divs and display them as needed) and on server (to remove them from the main page and put them in a place where you can retrieve them with ajax calls).

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thank you - but is this the right way to do this? is this the best way to optimize loading these divs? –  Raiders Jul 18 '11 at 18:01
    
Without seeing the actual content, I can't really say. This would be one way to do it. Perhaps the content is overly bloated and the best way to fix it is to just slim the content. You'd have to post a link to the real content with a little info about what div structure to look at for us to take a look. The loading of efficiently written plain HTML is rarely the actual bottleneck (one image is often larger than all the page HTML). –  jfriend00 Jul 18 '11 at 18:08

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