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My question is basically using printf print a char array.

In some cases, it prints the result out:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  char* orig = "@reveals#?the treasure chest#$President Barack H. Obama#";
  printf("The input: %s\n", orig);
  printf("The output: %s\n", reArrange(orig));

  return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

sometimes not:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  char* orig = "@reveals#?the treasure chest#$President Barack H. Obama#";
  printf("%s\n", reArrange(orig));

  return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Here is the complete code (the main function is included):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define SUBJECT '$'
#define ACTION '@'
#define OBJECT '?'
#define END '#'

char* reArrange(char* orig) {
  int origSize = strlen(orig);

  char subject[origSize], action[origSize], object[origSize];

//int i;
//for(i = 0; i < origSize; i++) {
//  subject[i] = ' ';
//  action[i] = ' ';
//  object[i] = ' ';
//}
  int subjectIndex = 0,   actionIndex = 0,  objectIndex = 0;

  int timesEndCharShowUp = 0;

  char state;
  int i;
  for(i = 0; i < origSize; i++) {
    char ch = orig[i];

    if(ch == SUBJECT) {
      state = SUBJECT;
    }
    else if(ch == ACTION) {
      state = ACTION;
    }
    else if(ch == OBJECT) {
      state = OBJECT;
    }
    else if(ch == END) {
      if(timesEndCharShowUp == 3) {
        break;
      }
      else {
        timesEndCharShowUp++;
      }
    }
    else {
      if(state == SUBJECT) {
        subject[subjectIndex++] = ch;
      }
      else if(state == ACTION) {
        action[actionIndex++] = ch;
      }
      else if(state == OBJECT) {
        object[objectIndex++] = ch;
      }
    }
  }

  subject[subjectIndex] = '\0';
  action[actionIndex] = '\0';
  object[objectIndex] = '\0';

  char rearranged[origSize];
  sprintf(rearranged, "%s %s %s.\0", subject, action, object);
  //printf("%s\n", rearranged);

  orig = rearranged;
  return orig;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  char* orig = "@reveals#?the treasure chest#$President Barack H. Obama#";
//  printf("The input: %s\n", orig);
//  printf("The output: %s\n", reArrange(orig));
  printf("result: ");
  printf("%s\n", reArrange(orig) );
//fflush(stdout);

  return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your function needs two parameters:

char* reArrange(char* orig)

Should be:

char* reArrange(char *rearragned, char* orig) {

// make your magic here!

}

Calling sequence:

char input[SIZE];
char rearrange [SIZE];

// initialize everything! Don't forget to rearrange[0] ='\0\;!!!

rearrange(rearranged, input);

// do you printing....

You should also learn how to use pointers correctly and look up "switch".

share|improve this answer
    
rearrange[0] needs no initialisation in this case, though you might choose to do so. –  Clifford Jul 19 '11 at 19:30

You are returning a pointer to memory that resides on the stack. rearranged is not available after the enclosing function (reArrange) returns and may contain garbage.

You may want to malloc rearranged or declare it globally.

share|improve this answer
1  
... or declare it static –  Clifford Jul 18 '11 at 18:06
    
@Clifford: static really means global but visible only in the enclosing function. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Jul 18 '11 at 18:06
    
I see, but why printf("The input: %s\n", orig);printf("The output: %s\n", reArrange(orig));works? –  draw Jul 18 '11 at 18:55
    
When it works, you are lucky. Learn how the stack works and what is undefined behaviour. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Jul 18 '11 at 18:56
    
@Blagovest: No not at all! Global variables are implicitly static, the converse is not true. static allocation is about the lifetime of a variable, globality on the other hand is about visibility and scope - if it has local scope it is by definition not global. Of course by the time you have returned a non-const pointer to it, any protection obtained from making it local is largely lost. Rudy's solution is the better and more usual one in any case. –  Clifford Jul 19 '11 at 18:52

The problem is that your function reArrange returns a pointer to memory that it no longer controls. The address of the rearranged array is returned. After the return occurs, this array effectively no longer exists -- the memory can, and will, be reused.

A quick hack which fixes your mistake is to declare rearranged as static. The long term fix is to learn how C works and code something using malloc() or an equivalent.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually in some cases declaring it static is both adequate and safer; not necessarily a hack. If you allocate it dynamically within reArrange() you are making the caller responsible for its disposal, so the caller would have to know how it was allocated. A better (and the most conventional) solution is as detailed by @Rudy Velthuis, then the caller decides on both allocation and disposal, which may or may not be dynamic. The static declaration would make the function non-re-entrant and therefore not thread-safe - as I said "in some cases...". –  Clifford Jul 18 '11 at 18:13
    
@Clifford -- "Actually," declaring it static makes the function non-thread-safe. Thus, it's a hack -- especially when recommend to an OP who has no idea what is going on. –  Heath Hunnicutt Jul 18 '11 at 18:17
    
Yes it makes it non-thread safe; that is exactly what I said, no argument - I did stress "in some cases" twice. In many cases thread safety is not an issue; e.g. when the application is not multi-threaded, or the function is only to be used in a single thread. The potential for a memory leak will exist with your suggestion in both single and multi-threaded applications. As I said the best solution is neither of these, but I'd place static allocation ahead of returning a dynamically allocated block. –  Clifford Jul 19 '11 at 18:41

With char rearranged[origSize]; you created a new character array which goes out of scope once reArrange terminates. So during the lifetime of reArrange, rearranged is a pointer which points to something meaningful ; hence, orig = rearranged makes sense.

But once it goes out of scope, reArrange(orig) returns the pointer to rearranged which is a dangling pointer now rearranged does not exist anymore.

share|improve this answer

Instead of only returning a char *, make reArrange() accept a buffer to which it can write the result. Now the caller must provide a suitable buffer to your function, and you have no problems with memory management anymore. You merely strncpy() arranged to the buffer. To be sure the buffer is large enough, the user should also provide the size of the buffer, in a 3rd argument:

char *rArrange(char *orig, char *result, int resultSize)
{
    if (!result || resultSize == 0)
        return NULL;

    /* your code here */

    strncpy(result, arranged, resultSize);
    return result;
}

The alternative malloc() to store the result is not very user fiendly (the user must freemem() the buffer but may not be aware of this). Using a static/global buffer is not very thread-safe.

share|improve this answer

Are you sure that the following section of the code works?

char* reArrange(char* orig) {
  int origSize = strlen(orig);

  char subject[origSize], action[origSize], object[origSize];

i mean origSize has to be a const it can't be a dynamic value. You should use malloc for allocating apace for subject , action and object. Moreover, you might consider a few guidelines:

1 Instead of:

for(i = 0; i < origSize; i++) {
    char ch = orig[i];    
    if(ch == SUBJECT) {
      state = SUBJECT;
}

You can have:

char ch;//declare char ch outside for loop
for(i = 0; i < origSize; i++) {
    ch = orig[i];

    if(ch == SUBJECT) {
      state = SUBJECT;
    }

2 you may like to use a switch statement instead of if, that will make your code look great.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, that section works. I learned C last summer, and then I quickly forget most non-intuitive ones after one year when I used Java a lot... Truly, switch is better~~ –  draw Jul 20 '11 at 5:04
    
I'm interested the 1st guideline, what's the reason behind it? –  draw Jul 20 '11 at 5:05

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