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In Java, given n Items, each with weight w, how does one choose a random Item from the collection with a chance equal to w?

Assume each weight is a double from 0.0 to 1.0, and that the weights in the collection sum to 1. Item.getWeight() returns the Item's weight.

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1  
How would you do it with pseudocode? – Marcelo Jul 18 '11 at 18:07
    
This is a special case of stackoverflow.com/questions/6409652/… where the weights have already been normalized. – kdkeck May 21 '15 at 0:13
up vote 23 down vote accepted
Item[] items = ...;

// Compute the total weight of all items together
double totalWeight = 0.0d;
for (Item i : items)
{
    totalWeight += i.getWeight();
}
// Now choose a random item
int randomIndex = -1;
double random = Math.random() * totalWeight;
for (int i = 0; i < items.length; ++i)
{
    random -= items[i].getWeight();
    if (random <= 0.0d)
    {
        randomIndex = i;
        break;
    }
}
Item myRandomItem = items[randomIndex];
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1  
This. FYI you can do a binary search if you need to. – Garrett Hall Jul 18 '11 at 18:16
7  
For a binary search the partial sums would have to be stored, too. – Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 18 '11 at 20:46

One elegant way would be to sample an exponential distribution http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exponential_distribution where the weights will be the rate of the distribution (lambda). Finally, you simply select the smallest sampled value.

In Java this looks like this:

public static <E> E getWeightedRandom(Map<E, Double> weights, Random random) {
    E result = null;
    double bestValue = Double.MAX_VALUE;

    for (E element : weights.keySet()) {
        double value = -Math.log(random.nextDouble()) / weights.get(element);

        if (value < bestValue) {
            bestValue = value;
            result = element;
        }
    }

    return result;
}

I am not sure whether this is more efficient than the other approaches, but if execution time is not the issue, it is a nicely looking solution.

And this is the same idea using Java 8 and Streams:

public static <E> E getWeightedRandomJava8(Stream<Entry<E, Double>> weights, Random random) {
    return weights
        .map(e -> new SimpleEntry<E,Double>(e.getKey(),-Math.log(random.nextDouble()) / e.getValue()))
        .min((e0,e1)-> e0.getValue().compareTo(e1.getValue()))
        .orElseThrow(IllegalArgumentException::new).getKey();
}

You can obtain the input weights stream for instance from a map by converting it with .entrySet().stream().

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  1. Give some arbitrary ordering to items... (i1, i2, ..., in)... with weights w1, w2, ..., wn.
  2. Choose a random number between 0 and 1 (with sufficient granularity, by using any randomization function and appropriate scaling). Call this r0.
  3. Let j = 1
  4. Subtract wj from your r(j-1) to get rj. If rj <= 0, then you select item ij. Otherwise, increment j and repeat.

I think I've done it like that before... but there are probably more efficient ways to do this.

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1  
wrji2wwjri, my poor eyes! – NateS Dec 16 '14 at 17:55

If you want runtime selection efficiency then taking a little more time on the setup would probably be best. Here is one possible solution. It has more code but guarantees log(n) selection.

WeightedItemSelector Implements selection of a random object from a collection of weighted objects. Selection is guaranteed to run in log(n) time.

public class WeightedItemSelector<T> {
    private final Random rnd = new Random();
    private final TreeMap<Object, Range<T>> ranges = new TreeMap<Object, Range<T>>();
    private int rangeSize; // Lowest integer higher than the top of the highest range.

    public WeightedItemSelector(List<WeightedItem<T>> weightedItems) {
        int bottom = 0; // Increments by size of non zero range added as ranges grows.

        for(WeightedItem<T> wi : weightedItems) {
            int weight = wi.getWeight();
            if(weight > 0) {
                int top = bottom + weight - 1;
                Range<T> r = new Range<T>(bottom, top, wi);
                if(ranges.containsKey(r)) {
                    Range<T> other = ranges.get(r);
                    throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format("Range %s conflicts with range %s", r, other));
                }
                ranges.put(r, r);
                bottom = top + 1;
            }
        }
        rangeSize = bottom; 
    }

    public WeightedItem<T> select() {
        Integer key = rnd.nextInt(rangeSize);
        Range<T> r = ranges.get(key);
        if(r == null)
            return null;
        return r.weightedItem;
    }
}

Range Implements range selection to leverage TreeMap selection.

class  Range<T> implements Comparable<Object>{
    final int bottom;
    final int top;
    final WeightedItem<T> weightedItem;
    public Range(int bottom, int top, WeightedItem<T> wi) {
        this.bottom = bottom;
        this.top = top;
        this.weightedItem = wi;
    }

    public WeightedItem<T> getWeightedItem() {
        return weightedItem;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Object arg0) {
        if(arg0 instanceof Range<?>) {
            Range<?> other = (Range<?>) arg0;
            if(this.bottom > other.top)
                return 1;
            if(this.top < other.bottom)
                return -1;
            return 0; // overlapping ranges are considered equal.
        } else if (arg0 instanceof Integer) {
            Integer other = (Integer) arg0;
            if(this.bottom > other.intValue())
                return 1;
            if(this.top < other.intValue())
                return -1;
            return 0;
        }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format("Cannot compare Range objects to %s objects.", arg0.getClass().getName()));
    }

    /* (non-Javadoc)
     * @see java.lang.Object#toString()
     */
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        builder.append("{\"_class\": Range {\"bottom\":\"").append(bottom).append("\", \"top\":\"").append(top)
                .append("\", \"weightedItem\":\"").append(weightedItem).append("}");
        return builder.toString();
    }
}

WeightedItem simply encapsulates an item to be selected.

public class WeightedItem<T>{
    private final int weight;
    private final T item;
    public WeightedItem(int weight, T item) {
        this.item = item;
        this.weight = weight;
    }

    public T getItem() {
        return item;
    }

    public int getWeight() {
        return weight;
    }

    /* (non-Javadoc)
     * @see java.lang.Object#toString()
     */
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        builder.append("{\"_class\": WeightedItem {\"weight\":\"").append(weight).append("\", \"item\":\"")
                .append(item).append("}");
        return builder.toString();
    }
}
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the weight is int, it should be double. – Yeti Nov 14 '13 at 14:26

TreeMap does already do all the work for you.

Create a TreeMap. Create weights based on your method of choice. Add the weights beginning with 0.0 while adding the weight of the last element to your running weight counter.

i.e. (Scala):

var count = 0.0  
for { object <- MyObjectList } { //Just any iterator over all objects 
  map.insert(count, object) 
  count += object.weight
}

Then you just have to generate rand = new Random(); num = rand.nextDouble() * count to get a valid number.

map.to(num).last  // Scala
map.floorKey(num) // Java

will give you the random weighted item.

For smaller amounts of buckets also possible: Create an array of i.e. 100,000 Int's and distribute the number of the bucket based on the weight across the fields. Then you create a random Integer between 0 and 100,000-1 and you immediately get the bucket-number back.

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+1 for an alternative that might be useful in a system with non-numeric weights and custom Comparators. Also, a good pointer towards setting up the binary-search approach mentioned in the comments on the leading answer (which should probably only be used if the weights are constant). But I wonder if TreeMap has too much overhead to be useful in a simple numeric-weight situation. – MandisaW Jul 25 '14 at 14:42
1  
Well there is always the compromise between saving a few CPU cycles or saving a few programmer hours. :) – mmlac Jul 30 '14 at 4:46
1  
Nice solution! I think a small change is required at least in case of Java and int weights. num will never be equal to count (i.e. sum of weights), and num = 0 will throw NullPointerException. Simple fix is to use map.lowerKey(num + 1). – arun Dec 8 '14 at 20:12
1  
Since rand.nextDouble() produces numbers between 0 (inclusive) and 1 (exclusive), a better idea might be to use num = (1-rand.nextDouble()) * count. – user1225054 May 13 '15 at 23:34
1  
@mmlac The point I was trying to make is this. The first object is inserted with the count of 0. When Java generates 0.0 as the random number (which can happen), TreeMap's lowerKey will return null, because, by its definition, it returns the greatest key strictly less than the given key, or null if there is no such key. So, you either ensure that the random number is strictly greater than 0, or you insert the first object with a different key. Another idea is whenever the random object that you get back is null, you query the tree for another one. – user1225054 May 14 '15 at 17:57

Below is a randomizer that maintains precision in proportions as well:

public class WeightedRandomizer
{
    private final Random randomizer;

    public WeightedRandomizer(Random randomizer)
    {
        this.randomizer = randomizer;
    }

    public IWeighable getRandomWeighable(List<IWeighable> weighables)
    {
        double totalWeight = 0.0;
        long totalSelections = 1;
        List<IWeighable> openWeighables = new ArrayList<>();

        for (IWeighable weighable : weighables)
        {
            totalWeight += weighable.getAllocation();
            totalSelections += weighable.getNumSelections();
        }

        for(IWeighable weighable : weighables)
        {
            double allocation = weighable.getAllocation() / totalWeight;
            long numSelections = weighable.getNumSelections();
            double proportion = (double) numSelections / (double) totalSelections;

            if(proportion < allocation)
            {
                openWeighables.add(weighable);
            }
        }

        IWeighable selection = openWeighables.get(this.randomizer.nextInt(openWeighables.size()));
        selection.setNumSelections(selection.getNumSelections() + 1);
        return selection;
    }
}
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With a Item class that contains a getWeight() method (as in your question):

/**
 * Gets a random-weighted object.
 * @param items list with weighted items
 * @return a random item from items with a chance equal to its weight.
 * @assume total weight == 1
 */
public static Item getRandomWeighted(List<Item> items) {
    double value = Math.random(), weight = 0;

    for (Item item : items) {
        weight += item.getWeight();
        if (value < weight)
            return item;
    }

    return null; // Never will reach this point if assumption is true
}

With a Map and more generic method:

/**
 * Gets a random-weighted object.
 * @param balancedObjects the map with objects and their weights.
 * @return a random key-object from the map with a chance equal to its weight/totalWeight.
 * @throws IllegalArgumentException if total weight is not positive.
 */
public static <E> E getRandomWeighted(Map<E, ? extends Number> balancedObjects) throws IllegalArgumentException {
    double totalWeight = balancedObjects.values().stream().mapToInt(Number::intValue).sum(); // Java 8

    if (totalWeight <= 0)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Total weight must be positive.");

    double value = Math.random()*totalWeight, weight = 0;

    for (Entry<E, ? extends Number> e : balancedObjects.entrySet()) {
        weight += e.getValue().doubleValue();
        if (value < weight)
            return e.getKey();
    }

    return null; // Never will reach this point
}
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