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i am new to object oriented javascript. I have a variable whose value i would like to use to call an object's method. like this..

var foo = {
    bar: function() {},
    barr: function() {}
}

now there is a variable whose value can be any of the two method's names bar and barr i want to call them with something like

var myvar = 'bar';
foo.{myVar}();
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If you are starting to learn JavaScript, this may be a nice article to read: John Resig's Learning Advanced Javascript. I know it says "advanced", but it starts from basic examples, and has a nice interactive interface for modifying and running the code. –  Groo Jul 18 '11 at 19:04
    
@Groo hey! thanks alot! a am new to object stuff and TBH they are a bit confusing.. :O but i am on it :D –  Achshar Jul 18 '11 at 19:06

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

So I assume you want to call the appropriate function dynamically based on a string. You can do something like this:

var myVar = 'bar';
foo[myVar]();

Or you can also use eval but this is riskier (prone to injection attack) and slower (don't do this! :P):

var myVar = 'bar';
eval('foo.' + myVar + '()');
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thanks.. there are so many answers :O looks like i asked a n00b question :P but hey thanks every body :) –  Achshar Jul 18 '11 at 19:00
2  
Don't beat yourself up if you learned something :) –  Justin Ethier Jul 18 '11 at 19:03
    
There is no n00b question except the one that was just answered :) –  pixelfreak Jul 18 '11 at 19:04
    
:D so apparently they work like arrays too.. we can call them like we call an array array['key']. interesting. thnx! –  Achshar Jul 18 '11 at 19:08
    
@Achshar - In your example, foo is an object. All objects can access their properties with array-type syntax. It isn't really an array (which is why I wrote this comment to make sure you don't think it's an array), but you can use the foo['x'] syntax to access the properties just the same as you can use foo.x. –  jfriend00 Jul 18 '11 at 19:21

Since you can access elements of an object via subscript notation, the following will do what you're looking for:

var myVar = 'bar';
foo[myVar]();
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You can just say:

foo[myVar]();

Since foo is a JavaScript object, this code will reference the member by name contained in the myVar variable.

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Use something like: foo[myVar]();

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it should be something like this

foo[myvar]();
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var foo = {
    bar: function() { alert('bar'); },
    barr: function() { alert('barr'); }
}


var myvar = 'bar';
foo[myvar](); // alert 'bar'
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I'm sure there's a better way, but you can use eval():

var myvar = "bar";
var code = "foo." + myvar + "();"
eval(code);
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Don't use eval it is evil –  John Hartsock Jul 18 '11 at 18:56

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