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In a binary search, we have two comparisons one for greater than and other for less than, otherwise its the mid value. How would you optimize so that we need to check only once?

bool binSearch(int array[], int key, int left, int right)
{

    mid = left + (right-left)/2;
    if (key < array[mid])
        return binSearch(array, key, left, mid-1);
    else if (key > array[mid])
        return binSearch(array, key, mid+1, right);
    else if (key == array[mid])
        return TRUE; // Found

    return FALSE; // Not Found
}
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This is not offensive either. –  BobbyShaftoe Mar 23 '09 at 15:27
    
Is there a reason not to use bsearch()? –  quinmars Mar 23 '09 at 15:34
    
@quinmars +1 if you write this as a regular answer. –  starblue Mar 23 '09 at 15:35
    
Looks like homework. –  Chris Oct 8 '09 at 1:29
    
Not at all Chris. –  Ganesh M Oct 9 '09 at 9:16

11 Answers 11

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I would try the bsearch() standard function first. Chances are good that it performes better than your approach.

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glibc implementation of bsearch() looks unoptimized (ftp.gnu.org/gnu/glibc) –  sambowry Oct 6 '09 at 7:17
    
this looks quite decent to me, as an iterative implementation sourceware.org/git/?p=glibc.git;a=blob_plain;f=stdlib/… –  Hasturkun Oct 6 '09 at 16:40
    
@sambowry, how would you optimize it? –  quinmars Oct 6 '09 at 17:32
    
@quinmars, a good book describe the optimization process cs.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/pearls –  sambowry Oct 6 '09 at 19:04
1  
@sambowry, sorry, I don't have that book, and I won't buy it just to see how he is implementing a binary search. –  quinmars Oct 6 '09 at 19:14

It's not advisable to try and optimize in the way you describe. From the Binary Search Algorithm article on Wikipedia:

About half the time, the first test will be true so that there will be only one comparison of a and b, but the other half of the time it will be false, and a second comparison forced. This is so grievous that some versions are recast so as not to make a second test at all thus not determining equality until the span has been reduced to zero, and thereby foregoing the possibility of early termination – remember that about half the time the search will happen on a matching value one iteration short of the limit.

It is quite easy to make this problem still worse (e.g. as in [3]) by using an order such as

if a = b then action3
 else if a > b then action2
  else action1;

Rather than detecting equality early (as it might appear to), this will force two comparisons to be performed for all but the last iteration of a search.

Some languages, like Fortran, have a three-way comparison that allows this step to be done with one comparison that branches to three different sections (see the tenth line of the Three-way comparison example). If your language doesn't support a three-way test (most languages don't) then two comparisons is the best you can do.

I would advise you to check out the iterative implementation from the same article, though.

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1  
I did the equality test first and it was faster than equality test last (probably modern superscalar processor weirdness). You may want to check Knuth ex 6.2.1 23 where he states the one way comparison is only faster for N> 2**36 –  paperhorse Jul 1 '09 at 5:14

I tried to reconstruct the optimization steps of the binary search algorithm. I start with this iterative version:

int binsearch_1( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  int found=0;
  while( size > 0 ){
    size_t w=size/2;
         if( p[w] <  key  ){ p+=w+1; size-=w+1; }
    else if( p[w] >  key  ){         size =w;   }
    else  /* p[w] == key */{ p+=w; found=1; break; }
  }
  *index=p-array; return found;
}

Eliminating comparisons from the loop:

int binsearch_2( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  while( size > 0 ){
    size_t w=size/2;
    if( p[w+1] <= key ){ p+=w+1; size-=w+1; } else size =w;
  }
  *index=p-array; return p[0]==key;
}

Unrolling small sizes from the loop:

int binsearch_3( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  while( size > 8 ){
    size_t w=size/2;
    if( p[w+1] <= key ){ p+=w+1; size-=w+1; } else  size =w;
  }
  if( size==8 ){ if( p[5] <=  key ){ p+=5; size=3; } else size=4; }
  if( size==7 ){ if( p[4] <=  key ){ p+=4; size=3; } else size=3; }
  if( size==6 ){ if( p[4] <=  key ){ p+=4; size=2; } else size=3; }
  if( size==5 ){ if( p[3] <=  key ){ p+=3; size=2; } else size=2; }
  if( size==4 ){ if( p[3] <=  key ){ p+=3; size=1; } else size=2; }
  if( size==3 ){ if( p[2] <=  key ){ p+=2; size=1; } else size=1; }
  if( size==2 ){ if( p[2] <=  key ){ p+=2; size=0; } else size=1; }
  if( size==1 ){ if( p[1] <=  key ){ p+=1;         }              }
  *index=p-array; return p[0]==key;
}

Reordering if statements, moving special cases [size==pow(2,N)-1] to the end:

int binsearch_4( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  while( size > 8 ){
    size_t w=size/2;
    if( p[w+1] <= key ){ p+=w+1; size-=w+1; } else  size =w;
  }
  if( size==8 ){ if( p[5] <=  key ){ p+=5; size=3; } else size=4; }
  if( size==6 ){ if( p[4] <=  key ){ p+=4; size=2; } else size=3; }
  if( size==5 ){ if( p[3] <=  key ){ p+=3; size=2; } else size=2; }
  if( size==4 ){ if( p[3] <=  key ){ p+=3; size=1; } else size=2; }
  if( size==2 ){ if( p[2] <=  key ){ p+=2; size=0; } else size=1; }

  if( size==7 ){ if( p[4] <=  key ){ p+=4; size=3; } else size=3; }
  if( size==3 ){ if( p[2] <=  key ){ p+=2; size=1; } else size=1; }
  if( size==1 ){ if( p[1] <=  key ){ p+=1;         }              }
  *index=p-array; return p[0]==key;
}

Changing if statements to a switch statement:

int binsearch_5( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  while( size > 8 ){
    size_t w=size/2;
    if( p[w+1] <= key ){ p+=w+1; size-=w+1; } else  size =w;
  }
  if( size==8 ){ if( p[5] <=  key ){ p+=5; size=3; } else size=4; }
  if( size==6 ){ if( p[4] <=  key ){ p+=4; size=2; } else size=3; }
  if( size==5 ){ if( p[3] <=  key ){ p+=3; size=2; } else size=2; }
  if( size==4 ){ if( p[3] <=  key ){ p+=3; size=1; } else size=2; }
  if( size==2 ){ if( p[2] <=  key ){ p+=2; size=0; } else size=1; }

  switch(size){
    case 7: if( p[4] <= key ) p+=4;
    case 3: if( p[2] <= key ) p+=2;
    case 1: if( p[1] <= key ) p+=1;
  }
  *index=p-array; return p[0]==key;
}

Extending switch statement to handle all of the special cases:

int binsearch_6( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  switch( size ){
#define C(n) case ((size_t)1<<n)-1: if( p[1<<(n-1)]<=key ) p+=1<<(n-1); 
#if SIZE_MAX == UINT64_MAX 
                                              C(63) C(62) C(61)
    C(60) C(59) C(58) C(57) C(56) C(55) C(54) C(53) C(52) C(51)
    C(50) C(49) C(48) C(47) C(46) C(45) C(44) C(43) C(42) C(41)
    C(40) C(39) C(38) C(37) C(36) C(35) C(34) C(33) C(32)
#endif 
                                                          C(31)
    C(30) C(29) C(28) C(27) C(26) C(25) C(24) C(23) C(22) C(21)
    C(20) C(19) C(18) C(17) C(16) C(15) C(14) C(13) C(12) C(11)
    C(10) C( 9) C( 8) C( 7) C( 6) C( 5) C( 4) C( 3) C( 2) C( 1)
#undef C 
      break;
    default:
      while( size > 0 ){
        size_t w=size/2;
        if( p[w] < key ){ p+=w+1; size-=w+1; } else size=w;
      }
  }
  *index=p-array; return p[0]==key;
}

Eliminating the general case handling from the code: [ w is the smallest number: w==pow(2,N)-1; size<=2*(w+1) ]

int binsearch_7( arr_t array[], size_t size, arr_t key, size_t *index ){
  if( !array || !size ) return 0;
  arr_t *p=array;
  size_t w=(size-1)>>1; w|=w>>1; w|=w>>2; w|=w>>4; w|=w>>8; w|=w>>16;
#if SIZE_MAX == UINT64_MAX
  w|=w>>32;
#endif
  if( p[w]<key ) p+=size-w-1;
  switch( w ){
#define C(n) case ((size_t)1<<n)-1: if( p[1<<(n-1)]<=key ) p+=1<<(n-1);
#if SIZE_MAX == UINT64_MAX
                                              C(63) C(62) C(61)
    C(60) C(59) C(58) C(57) C(56) C(55) C(54) C(53) C(52) C(51)
    C(50) C(49) C(48) C(47) C(46) C(45) C(44) C(43) C(42) C(41)
    C(40) C(39) C(38) C(37) C(36) C(35) C(34) C(33) C(32)
#endif
                                                          C(31)
    C(30) C(29) C(28) C(27) C(26) C(25) C(24) C(23) C(22) C(21)
    C(20) C(19) C(18) C(17) C(16) C(15) C(14) C(13) C(12) C(11)
    C(10) C( 9) C( 8) C( 7) C( 6) C( 5) C( 4) C( 3) C( 2) C( 1)
#undef C
  }
  *index=p-array; return p[0]==key;
}

The last step what i made was the simplifying of the case labels [from: '((size_t)1<<n)-1' to: 'n'] but i found that the modified code was slower on my old PC than the previous version.

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If you want to optimize your binary search algorithm you must replace recursion with iteration. See examples at wikipedia.

Let me know if you need more details.

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In the code you posted, you can remove the last comparison. That is, if key is not less than array[mid] or greater than array[mid], then by definition it's equal. So your code becomes:

mid = left + (right-left)/2;
if (key < array[mid])
    return binSearch(array, key, left, mid-1);
else if (key > array[mid])
    return binSearch(array, key, mid+1, right);
else 
    return TRUE; // Found

Also note that I've removed the last line. In your original code, it's impossible for the return FALSE; ever to be executed. I would assume that you have a check at the beginning of your binSearch which checks to see if left <= right.

In C, there is no way to do a three-way comparison/branch based on less than, equal, greater than, so you have to do two comparisons to select among three possibilities.

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For integers it doesn't matter, don't do it.

For more expensive comparisons use -1, 0, 1 for <, =, > like in the C library function strcmp or Java's compareTo().

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actually, I think it is worth it for integers as it potentially removes two array accesses. You'd have to profile to be sure, of course. –  anon Mar 23 '09 at 15:35
3  
@Neil If the array were accessed more than once that would be a really lousy compiler. –  starblue Mar 23 '09 at 15:37

Ganesh M - If the key does not exist in the array, then your function will be stuck inside of a never ending loop. It can never return FALSE.

What is the optimal way to find the insertion point, if the key does not exist?

A conditional "if cascade" accounting for <, ==, and > will only return TRUE, or continue to compute forever.

I need the optimal condition to determine when a key has been isolated as not existing.

I know that this will slow down the search, but I want to slow it down by the least amount.

playing with log(N)/log(2) seems like a good idea, but when N is not a power of 2, things can go haywire.

Perhaps, I should choose an array with a size of power of 2, and use a simple while loop?

does checking if the midpoint == to either bound increase the number of comparisons too much?

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1  
+1 for noticing that glaring problem with the algorithm –  Tomer Vromen May 29 '10 at 11:40
// Optimized Binary Search Implementation
int binsearch(int* data, int size, int val)
{
    int result = -1;
    int start, mid, end;
    start = 0;
    end = size - 1;
    mid = (start + end) >> 1;
    while (start <= end && data[mid] != val)
    {
        if (data[mid] > val)
            end = mid - 1;
        else
            start = mid + 1;
        mid = (start + end) >> 1;
    }
    if (val == data[mid])
        result = mid;
    return result;
}
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Its an exercise question in K&R second edition.

While(low <= high && arr[mid]!=num)
{
    if(arr[mid] > num)
    {
       low = mid+1;
    }
    else
    {
       high = mid-1;
    }
    mid = (low+high)/2;
}

if(arr[mid] == num)
{
    printf("found the ugly number");
    return mid;
}
share|improve this answer
bool binSearch(int array[], int key, int len)
{
    int mid, low, high;

    low = 0;
    right = len - 1;
    mid = low + (high-low)/2;

    while ((low <= high) && (array[mid] != key)) {
         if (key < array[mid]) {
             high = mid - 1;
         } else {
             low = mid + 1;
         }
         mid = low + (high-low)/2;
    }

    if (array[mid] == key) {
        return TRUE;
    }
    return FALSE;
}
share|improve this answer
BinarySearch = function (array, value)  
{  
    var l = 0;  
    var r = array.length;  
    var mid;  
    while (l!=r)  
    {  
        mid = Math.round( (r+l)/2 )-1;  
        if(value > array[mid])  
            l=mid+1;  
        else  
            r=mid;  
    }  
    if(array[mid]==value)  
        return mid;  
    else  
    {  
        if( (mid < (array.length-1)) && (array[mid+1]==value) )  
            return mid+1;  
        else  
            return -1; // Not found  
    }  
}

source: http://calcs.appspot.com/docview?id=agVjYWxjc3IPCxIIRG9jdW1lbnQY0w8M

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What is that language - hardly looks like C to me... copy 'n' paste not good enough.... –  t0mm13b Oct 10 '12 at 19:36
    
so what if its not C ? –  Hardbug Oct 17 '12 at 20:47

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