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private object lockObj = new object();

private Dictionary<int, string> dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();

public string GetOrAddFromDict(int key)
{
    string value;

    // non-locked access:
    if (dict.TryGetValue(key, out value))
        return value;

    lock (this.lockObj)
    {
        if (dict.TryGetValue(key, out value))
            return value;

        string newValue = "value of " + key; // place long operation here
        dict.Add(key, newValue);

        return newValue;
    }
}

Question a: Is it thread-safe? If yes, why?

Question b: How is this double-TryGetValue() pattern called?

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Side note; that pattern of double-checked locking is explicitly safe for Hashtable. It is less clear whether that is safe for dictionary. –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '11 at 20:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

a) This is not thread-safe, as the underlying Dictionary itself is not thread safe. If another thread is calling Add at the same time, undefined behavior can occur.

b) This is effectively an attempt at double-checked locking.

I would recommend using the ConcurrentDictionary class instead, as it's designed for this scenario. Another option would be to use a ReaderWriterLockSlim (or ReaderWriterLock), if you're not targetting .NET 4.0.

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-1 ReaderWriterLockSlim and ReaderWriterLock are far more expensive than 'lock', especially on write. The only reason to use these is when your doing something like 100 or 1000 reads for every write AND the duration of read lock is significant enough to cause substantial delays on the other threads. With code this trivial (a single TryGetValue) the 'lock' statement is the correct synchronization. –  csharptest.net Jul 18 '11 at 20:34
    
@csharptest.net that's harsh; his recommendation was ConcurrentDictionary, which would be fine - and since Reed isn't the OP, we don't know the reader/writer rate. ReaderWriterLockSlim might actually be fine, for all we know. –  Marc Gravell Jul 18 '11 at 20:39
    
@csharptest The following blog entry claims the performance overhead of ReaderWriterLockSlim over Monitor is about a factor 2. From your comment I expected a factor beyond 10. blogs.msdn.com/b/pedram/archive/2007/10/07/… –  CodesInChaos Jul 18 '11 at 20:48
    
@Marc Gravell, Fair enough I am being a little harsh, but to get a -1 on a +5 answer isn't going to hurt Reed's rep any ;) ConcurrentDictionary was suggested; however, this class is 4.0 only and we don't know what version the OP is using. Thus his recommendation of the other locks can cause serious performance issues. As noted using these Reader/Writer locks requires not only a threshold of read:write ratio, but also requires a complex (or time consuming) read/write process to be benefitial. I was only trying to ensure that the OP did not stray down a very painful road. –  csharptest.net Jul 18 '11 at 20:51
    
@Reed Copsey, Sorry for the -1 on an otherwise very good answer. I hope that my comment above explains my reasoning. –  csharptest.net Jul 18 '11 at 20:51

Question a: Is it thread-safe? If yes, why?

Not only is it not thread safe; it will also throw with NullReferenceException if accessed while another thread is reorganizing the hash buckets. The lock statement is wicked fast, don't avoid it.

Question b: How is this double-TryGetValue() pattern called?

It's called a 'bug' by most people ;)

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Sadly, no.

I carry around a custom HashMap that has this property.

The defect is in the rehash() function.

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