Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I want to be able to take the id from another collection, and use that as the key for a hash. Then I would like to be able to apply various attributes to each. It would be something like:

@books = Hash.new

@books[key].title = "A Title"
@books[key].condition = "Poor"
@books[key].rating = "Excellent"

or something to that effect. Is this even possible with some tweaks?

Thanks for your time!

Edit: I should have added that it is undesirable to create a Class in this case, although I may end up having to do that.

share|improve this question
    
What's the problem with creating a class? Do you don't know which keys you will get? then you could solve the problem with method_missing. (example will follow in my answer) – knut Jul 18 '11 at 20:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use multidimensional Hash?

@books = Book.all
@books_hash = {}
@books.each do |book|
  @books_hash[book.id] = {}
  @books_hash[book.id][:title] = book.title
  @books_hash[book.id][:rating] = book.rating
end
share|improve this answer
    
@books_hash[book.id][:title] is going to give you a NoMethodError: undefined method '[]' unless you init the second tier hash first, @books_hash[book.id] = {}. – diedthreetimes Jul 18 '11 at 20:34
    
@diedthreetimes, yeap – fl00r Jul 18 '11 at 20:34
    
Okay thank you. I didn't consider/know about multidimensional hashes in Ruby. I'm working on getting that to work now, and I think I have it. And thanks diedthreetimes, I was in fact getting a NoMethodError: undefined method. I'm trying to figure out now how to iterate through the hashmap, printing out the value of each second tier hash. In haml. – Alex Jul 18 '11 at 20:39
1  
@mu: Actually, change Hash.new { { } } to Hash.new {|h, k| h[k] = { } }, otherwise you changes won't get recorded. – Marc-André Lafortune Jul 19 '11 at 1:47
    
@mu: You might want to double check. h=Hash.new { { } }; h[:foo][:bar]=24; h[:foo] # => {} – Marc-André Lafortune Jul 19 '11 at 15:30

If you want exactly that syntax you can create a hash of OpenStructs:

require 'ostruct'
@books = Hash.new { |h, k| h[k] = OpenStruct.new }
key = 1
@books[key].title = "A Title"
@books[key].condition = "Poor"
@books[key].rating = "Excellent"
@books #=> {1=>#<OpenStruct title="A Title", condition="Poor", rating="Excellent">}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for OpenStruct. I find all the ` #=> ...` unhelpful except the last one... I didn't edit them out, but I removed the leading >> . – Marc-André Lafortune Jul 19 '11 at 1:49
    
@Marc-André: Thanks, it's a direct copy from my IRB where irb_rocket puts the return value on every line. It was late and I didn't feel like editing the post. – Michael Kohl Jul 19 '11 at 6:31
    
Didn't know about irb_rocket, cute idea :-) – Marc-André Lafortune Jul 19 '11 at 15:30

You probably never want to do this, but just to answer the question.

Is this even possible with some tweaks?

Yes, we can create our own class to do this pretty easily.

class MyAnonObject
  attr_accessor attributes

  def attributes
    @attributes ||= {}
  end

  def method_missing method, *args, &block
    if method =~ /^(\w+)=$/
      @attributes[$1] = args[0]
    else
      @attributes[$1]
    end     
  end
end

And then we can modify your example to use this new class.

@books = Hash.new { MyAnonObject.new }

@books[key].title = "A Title"
@books[key].condition = "Poor"
@books[key].rating = "Excellent"

That being said, I wouldn't recommend this solution. It can be very confusing to read. However, it is possible =) And really, this is just a multi-dimensional hash with strange semantics.

share|improve this answer

You can make an object of type Book.

class Book
  attr_accessor :tilte, :rating, :condition
end

And then modify your example to use the new Book class.

@books = Hash.new

@books[key] = Book.new
@books[key].title = "A Title"
@books[key].condition = "Poor"
@books[key].rating = "Excellent"
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry. I never specified. I won't say that I necessarily CAN'T make a class in this case, but it is very undesirable in this isolated case. – Alex Jul 18 '11 at 20:33

Similar to diedthreetimes anser, but the Book.new is done by the Hash:

class Book
  attr_accessor :title
  attr_accessor :condition
  attr_accessor :rating
  def initialize()
    @undefined_values = {}
  end
  def method_missing ( m, *args )
    @undefined_values[m] = args
  end
  def inspect()
    "Book #{@title} (#{@condition}, #{@rating}, #{@undefined_values.inspect})"
  end
end  
@books = Hash.new{ |hash,k| hash[k] =  Book.new 
}

key = :xx
@books[key].title = "A Title"
@books[key].condition = "Poor"
@books[key].rating = "Excellent"
@books[key].isbn = "123456"

p @books[key] #-> Book A Title (Poor, Excellent, {:isbn==>["123456"]})

edit: Added code to handle undefined values. p @books[key]

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.