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I have an extremely strange Problem, while trying to develop for android on eclipse

my program always returned non-sense statements, so I tried debugging it.

And Now I understand what the problem is.... ...the code acts literally crazy - it's absolutely illogical

this is my code:

ArrayList<String[]> formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books);

if (formatedVerses.size() < 1) { // check if readAndSplitDatabaseFile worked
    createDatabase(database, false); // if not. the database wasnt initialized
    formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books); // try again 
}

return formatedVerses;

basically I create this ArrayList

But when I debug, it doesnt just go trough the code from top to bottom, it makes weird illogical jumps

the debugger arrives at the line:

ArrayList<String[]> formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books);

then jumps to the if-statement (so far so good)

if (formatedVerses.size() < 1) {

but "formatedVerses.size() < 1" is false, so it should jump over the if-block

but instead the debugger not only jumps INTO the if-block, but it actually jumps into THE SECOND LINE of the block:

formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books);

which makes no sense whatsoever.

I feel like somebody is playing jokes on me.

I just cant wrap my mind around this.....

I've also tried restructuring the code... but it only gets weirder.

I've also tried other implementations. for example like this:

if (formatedVerses.size() < 1) {
return array1;
} else{
doSomethingElse();
return array2;
}

in that case, it jumps into the true-statement of the if-block

 return array1;

and then, when I click on next-step, it actually JUMPS from that line to the return array2 line inside of the else-block, while completely leaving out the doSomethingElse()-line

anybody got any ideas? because I'm going crazy right now...

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1  
Aside from the problem you are experiencing; why would the database be initialized a split microsecond later if it wasn't in the first run? You would use a while, but -even better- a better design pattern –  Will Kru Jul 18 '11 at 23:04
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4 Answers

Usually when I see behavior like this, it is because I am not running the code I think I am running. I have not done Android development, so I can't speak specifically to that, but do you have "build automatically" under the project menu checked? I have found that to reduce the number of times I see this behavior tremendously.

Have you tried cleaning the code and doing a complete rebuild? Are you running this out of Eclipse or on a remote device? If on a remote device, have you published the code to the device?

As I said, I haven't done any Android development, so some of these questions may seem obvious from an Andriod developing standpoint.

Hope those ideas help.

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1. 'Build Automatically' was turned on i turned it off - still no change. i cleaned the project - still no change. i said 'build all' - no change. turned on 'Build Automatically' again - no change. 2. how do I do a complete rebuild? and 3. I've tried running the code on the android-emulator, and also on a real device so I'm guessing the device is not the problem –  RazorHail Jul 18 '11 at 20:52
    
ahh OK - I was just trying to go through the standard operating procedures I always went through with that. Sounds like it might be something specific to the Android environment that you are experiencing, at which point I must step away, given my lack of experience. –  aperkins Jul 18 '11 at 21:08
    
Yeah, after reading through it again - it still feels strongly to me like you are not executing the code you think you are. I don't know how that could happen, but it seems like something in your environment is keeping old code around. –  aperkins Jul 18 '11 at 21:24
    
no problem. I actually do believe that it has something to do with eclipse itself.....anyway, thank you for your help nevertheless –  RazorHail Jul 18 '11 at 21:26
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To me, it actually sounds like your braces are misaligned in some way. It appears to be ignoring the braces around the if statement, treating it like this.

if (formatedVerses.size() < 1) // check if readAndSplitDatabaseFile worked
    createDatabase(database, false); // if not. the database wasnt initialized
formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books); // try again 

Doesn't really explain your second example though.

EDIT: Or maybe your second block is also parsing oddly.. doesn't explain why the code continues after a return statement though.

if (formatedVerses.size() < 1) 
    return array1;
else
    doSomethingElse();
return array2;
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I dont really think thats it. Ive just deleted this particular code-block and re-wrote it. I CAN'T misplace brackets anyway, because I never type in the brackets myself. I always use STRG+SPACE to auto-complete everything ;) –  RazorHail Jul 18 '11 at 21:10
    
Welp, I'm out of ideas then. Good luck! –  Coeffect Jul 18 '11 at 21:20
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just to elaborate on what aperkins said, which is all correct, the Eclipse debugger uses line number information from when your code was compiled into a .class file, and uses your source .java file to display what line of code is being run. So say you write this :

if (readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books).size() < 1) { 
    createDatabase(database, false); // if not. the database wasnt initialized
    formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books); // try again 
}

return formatedVerses;

and you build and run, and then you add a line of code and a blank line:

ArrayList<String[]> formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books);

if (formatedVerses.size() < 1) { // check if readAndSplitDatabaseFile worked
    createDatabase(database, false); // if not. the database wasnt initialized
    formatedVerses = readAndSplitDatabaseFile(database, books); // try again 
}

return formatedVerses;

now when you are debugging, you are stepping through the first example, but looking at the second. The solution as aperkins mentioned is just to build and run again, or to undo your changes until they match up with what you had when you last compiled.

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I don't think thats it. I just wrote println inside of the if-block - in between the first and second statement. but the debugger now jumps to the 3rd statement. If he went by line-numbers, shouldnt he have jumped to the syso instead? –  RazorHail Jul 18 '11 at 21:18
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, I figured it out.

Strangely it was something completely different.

I made some mistakes on the complete other side of my program. It had nothing to do with this code-segment (the problems weren't even in the same class.)

once that was fixed, it started to act normal again.

I don't understand it and at this point, I don't want to understand it.

Thanks for the help, everybody.

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