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I'm trying to add a line of text to the middle of a text file in a bash script. Specifically I'm trying add a nameserver to my /etc/resolv.conf file. As it stands, resolv.conf looks like this:

# Generated by NetworkManager
domain dhcp.example.com
search dhcp.example.com
nameserver 10.0.0.1
nameserver 10.0.0.2
nameserver 10.0.0.3

My goal is to add nameserver 127.0.0.1 above all other nameserver lines, but below any text above that. In the end I want to my resolve.conf file to look like this:

# Generated by NetworkManager
domain dhcp.example.com
search dhcp.example.com
nameserver 127.0.0.1
nameserver 10.0.0.1
nameserver 10.0.0.2
nameserver 10.0.0.3

How is this possible via a bash script? Is this something sed or awk can do? Or would creative greping to recreate the file be my best move?

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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here is a solution using sed:

$ sed -n 'H;${x;s/nameserver .*\n/nameserver 127.0.0.1\
&/;p;}' resolv.conf

# Generated by NetworkManager
domain dhcp.example.com
search dhcp.example.com
nameserver 127.0.0.1
nameserver 10.0.0.1
nameserver 10.0.0.2
nameserver 10.0.0.3

How it works: first, the output of sed should be suppressed with the -n flag. Then, for each line, we append the line to the hold space, separating them with newlines:

H

When we come to the end of the file (addressed by $) we move the content of the hold space to the pattern space:

x

hen we replace the first line starting with nameserver by a line containing nameserver 127.0.0.1, a new line (represented by \ followed by a newline - maybe your sed version supports \n instead...) and the original line (represented by &):

s/nameserver .*\n/nameserver 127.0.0.1\
&/

Now we just need to print the results:

p
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This is great. Only thing weird is it adds a blank line at the top of the new file. Not a big deal, but it's causing an OCD moment. –  PHLAK Jul 18 '11 at 21:15
2  
Oh, yes, you are right! The command sed -n 'H;${x;s/^\n//;s/nameserver .*\n/nameserver 127.0.0.1\n&/;p;}' resolv.conf, however, solves this problem. I added s/^\n// to the command so it will remove the newline at the beginning of the content of pattern space. –  brandizzi Jul 18 '11 at 21:17
    
Awesome, thanks! –  PHLAK Jul 18 '11 at 21:42
    
When running this same script on another machine with only one nameserver line it's not inserting anything. –  PHLAK Jul 19 '11 at 3:34
2  
Probably because there is no newline at the end of the line. It is easy to solve, too: sed -n 'H;${x;s/^\n//;s/nameserver .*$/nameserver 127.0.0.1\n&/;p;}' resolv.conf Now we replace from the first nameserver until the end of the file - I replaced the \n in /nameserver .*\n/ by the marker of end of line $. Again, not that the \n in /nameserver 127.0.0.1\n&/ may have to be replaced by a `` followed by an actual newline in some sed versions. –  brandizzi Jul 19 '11 at 13:18
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Assuming you want to insert immediately after the search line, this is much simpler:

sed -e'/^search/a nameserver 127.0.0.1' filename > newfile
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That's the thing... that search line may or may not be there. The nameserver lines should always be there, and I want the new line inserted immediately before them regardless of the rest of the contents of the file. –  PHLAK Jul 18 '11 at 21:16
    
@PHLAK, the solution offered by Jim is good. I would modify it, though. Simply add a special comment to mark the line where new stuff is supposed to be entered. E.g. a line like #<<INSERT>> or something. Then, instead of /^search/ you can look for /^#<<INSERT>>$/, making it far more unlikely to match the wrong line. –  bitmask Jul 18 '11 at 22:22
    
How would you modify this (if possible) to use a single line from another file (assume that this file has only one line), instead of nameserver 127.0.0.1? –  Juan May 13 '13 at 23:31
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awk '/^nameserver/ && !modif { printf("INSERT\n"); modif=1 } {print}'

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How about something like:

sed -e ':a;N;$!ba;s/nameserver/nameserver 127.0.0.1\nnameserver/' /etc/resolv.conf

(similar to this: sed: Find pattern over two lines, not replace after that pattern)

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This might work for you:

 sed -e '/nameserver/{x;/./b;x;h;i\nameserver 127.0.0.1' -e '}' resolv.conf

Or GNU sed:

sed -e '0,/nameserver/{//i\nameserver 127.0.0.1' -e '}' resolv.conf
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