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When i hit savebutton the form is not submitted,what could be wrong with my code?Thank you in advance.I am using Rails 3.1

FORM

 <%=form_for :user ,:remote=>true do |f|%>
 <%= f.label :school %>
 <%= f.text_field :school,:size=>"45",:class=>"round",:id=>"school" %>
 <%= f.submit "save and continue",{:class=>"savebutton" }%>
 <%end%>

JQUERY(application.js)

$(".savebutton").bind('click',function() {  
  $('form').submit(function() { 
    var formToSubmit = $(this).serialize();
    $.ajax({
      url: $(this).attr('action'), 
      data: formToSubmit,
      dataType: "JSON" 
     });
    return false; 
  });
});

CONTROLLER

class SchoolController < ApplicationController
  respond_to :json

  def create
    @school = current_user.schools.build(params[:school].merge(:user => current_user))

    @school = current_user.school.build(params[:school].merge(:user => current_user))

    if @school.save
      respond_with @school
    else
      respond_with @school.errors, :status => :unprocessable_entity
    end
  end
end
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well @vinceh's answer is definitely the way you should be doing this, you still can do it the old-fashioned way like you are.

The .submit() method does not submit the form (you may be thinking it does), but instead binds the form's submit event to the method you provide. So right now, when you click the submit button, all it does is set up the callback, but then you return false so the form never actually gets submitted.

You should just be able to get rid of the surrounding $('.savebutton).click(...) handler and put the $('form').submit(...) handler directly in your javascript, so that when the page loads, the callback is registered immediately. You don't need to worry about handling the .savebutton click specifically.

Also, your Ajax request probably needs a type: 'POST' or type: 'PUT', since $.ajax defaults to GET requests.

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So you mean like the changes i just made?Look at the form and ajax function –  katie Jul 18 '11 at 21:44
    
Well if you use :remote => true, you should just be able to get rid of your javascript code altogether. But if you want to do it the old way, you couldn't use :remote => true, and you would get rid of the $(.savebutton) code (you changed it to a bind instead of just getting rid of it). –  Dylan Markow Jul 18 '11 at 21:48

If you want to use ajax, you need to add :remote => true in your form_for and with Rails you don't need to explicitly call $.ajax if your form has :remote => true. Read this for a good tutorial on how to use AJAX in your Rails applications.

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