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I am learning python and i can't figure out why the following program is printing your number is greater than what i thought even when the guessed number is smaller. is it like in python, it is comparing strings rather the numbers ?

number = 32
tries = 1

print "I have chosen a number, you have to guess it."
guess = raw_input ("Guess:")

while guess != number:
    tries = tries+1
    if guess > number:
        print("Your guess is greater than i thought")
        guess = raw_input ("Another Guess:")
    else:
        print("Your guess is smaller than i thought")
        guess = raw_input ("Another Guess:")

print "You guess it right in %d turns." %tries

P.S:I know its a dumb question but i am a noob at python!

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1  
Yes, comparing strings rather than numbers won't do, because e.g. '10' < '9' since '1' < '9'. –  9000 Jul 18 '11 at 21:11
1  
What are the inputs you are trying? Please be more specific as to what you are trying, what your expected result is in each case, and what you are getting instead. Also, if the issue is string comparison, I highly doubt guess > number will ALWAYS be true-- see if you can find cases where it isn't true, and then you will understand more about what the actual problem is. –  Platinum Azure Jul 18 '11 at 21:11
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I didn't know this until just now, but as it turns out, a string will always be "greater than" an integer in Python:

>>> "0" > 1
True

All you need to do is replace

guess = raw_input ("Guess:")

with

guess = int(raw_input ("Guess:"))
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I think I remember reading somewhere that if all else fails, Python simply compares the type names for determining the result of comparison checks: that is, since "string" comes after "int" (or "integer" or "number" or what have you), that explains why "0" > 1 is True. (Note: When I say "if all else fails", I mean if type coercion fails in both directions) –  Platinum Azure Jul 18 '11 at 21:13
2  
Note: Python 3 causes a type error when comparing uncomparable values like int-str. –  utdemir Jul 18 '11 at 21:14
2  
And it should! I'm surprised something so silly survived in Python for so long... –  fletom Jul 18 '11 at 21:15
    
Does that mean Python 3 causes an error if you try to sort a list with mixed types in it? –  neil Jul 18 '11 at 21:29
    
@neil: Yes, it does. What else could it (reasonably) do? (Note that if you're talking instances of user-defined classes, you can always make them support comparison with objects of different types). –  Ben Jul 18 '11 at 23:03
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raw_input will return a string. You need to parse it into a number for the compare to work properly. I think that's just int(raw_input(...))

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4  
It may be good to wrap a try except around the int() in case the input isn't numeric. –  GreenMatt Jul 18 '11 at 21:25
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Catching an exception might help as well if you are guessing a large number and you accidentally hit a letter you don't really want your program to bail out.

while guess != number:

    if guess > number:
        print("Your guess is greater than i thought")

    else:
        print("Your guess is smaller than i thought")
    try:    
        guess = int(raw_input ("Another Guess:"))
        tries = tries+1
    except ValueError:
        print "Input must be numeric"
print "You guess it right in %d turns." %tries
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I think this is because raw_input is considered a string, so Python assigns it a value based on the char values. Try writing int(raw_input("text")) and see if it solves your problem.

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You may also use input(prompt), which is equivalent to eval(raw_input(prompt)). When inputing an integer, eval will return an int.

When inputting a float, string etc., input will return an object of the corresponding type, so you should still check if the returned value is an integer.

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1  
You know, if you guys are going to downvote an answer like this you might want to take a moment to explain why you feel it's a bad idea. –  Toji Jul 19 '11 at 16:32
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