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Background

I've got a webpage which displays webcomics. There are currently 1622 pages. I need to display the current comic page (I have its ID), and the links to the first, previous, next and last pages. The ordering is also non-trivial (there's a long ORDER BY due to quirky DB design - legacy stuff), so I can't do stuff like "where ID=1" either.

The question

So, the question is easy - I know the ID of a record. I do a SELECT ... FROM ... WHERE ... ORDER BY ... query and want to retrieve the first record, the last record, the record with the ID I know of, and the records directly preceding and succeeding the record with the known ID.

The unfiltered query returns over 1600 rows, and there's a new row every day. The query will be run several times per second (there's a fair readership). What's the most efficient way? Is there anything better than the naive "get all rows and filter out what I need in PHP code"? Note that I know I can cache the result on PHP-side, but I was wondering if there is some MySQL-related optimization available here.

Added: One solution is to do several queries - one for each required value. I should have said that I know of it and was thinking of something more elegant.

share|improve this question

Why not add an OrderedID column that is sequential and ordered in the proper way? You could initially populate using your complex query, then keep it updated as new pages are added.

If modifying the existing table is not an option, you could create a new table with just two columns, a FK that points to your pages table, and a OrderedID column like above?

That means for any page ID=X, you would need 1, X-1, X, X+1, and Max() - only Max() actually requires a query, and that would only change once per day. The others could just be computed.

share|improve this answer

With only 1600 rows, I don't think there is any efficiency issue at all, however you implement this. Lets assume though, that you may have 16M rows.

Assuming your query is something like:

SELECT ...  FROM ...  WHERE ... 
ORDER BY colA ASC
       , colB DESC
       , ...
       , colZ ASC

and that id is a unique key and the specific id is @id.

You can add an index on (colA, colB, ..., colZ) and try this:

  ( SELECT ...  FROM ...  WHERE ... 
    ORDER BY colA ASC
           , colB DESC
           , ...
           , colZ ASC
    LIMIT 1          --- to get the first row
  )
  UNION ALL
  ( SELECT ...  FROM ...  WHERE ... 
                            AND (colA, colB, ..., colZ) 
          <  ( SELECT colA, colB, ..., colZ
               FROM ... 
               WHERE id = @id )
    ORDER BY colA DESC       --- order reversed
           , colB ASC        --- order reversed
           , ...
           , colZ DESC       --- order reversed
    LIMIT 1          --- to get the previous row
  )
  UNION ALL
  ( SELECT ...  FROM ...  WHERE ... 
                            AND (colA, colB, ..., colZ) 
          >= ( SELECT colA, colB, ..., colZ
               FROM ... 
               WHERE id = @id )
    ORDER BY colA ASC
           , colB DESC
           , ...
           , colZ ASC
    LIMIT 2          --- to get the row with @id and the next one
  )
  UNION ALL
  ( SELECT ...  FROM ...  WHERE ... 
    ORDER BY colA DESC       --- order reversed
           , colB ASC        --- order reversed
           , ...             --- ...
           , colZ DESC       --- order reversed
    LIMIT 1          --- to get the last row
  )
share|improve this answer
    
It's the several-queries solution again. OK, I guess it deserves an upvote for being on-topic. Still I hoped for something better. – Vilx- Jul 18 '11 at 23:10
    
@Vilx-: It's not a several queries solution. It's one query with several subqueries and using UNION ALL. I would try it even in a million rows table. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 18 '11 at 23:15
    
Is the performance gain from UNION ALL really that much better than just running 4 separate queries? – Vilx- Jul 19 '11 at 10:04
    
No, UNION or UNION ALL will be almost identical in speed with only 5 rows returned. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 19 '11 at 10:08
    
But running 4 or 5 separate queries, instead of 1, why? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 19 '11 at 10:09

Well.. I think that this problem can be accomplished with a lot less logic. If the ID's are auto increment (which would make this super simple) then you really can use basic arithmetic.

SELECT count(comicId)
FROM comics;

//Get that answer in php
$low = 0; //this could be anything. 
$high = count;
$one = (($high - $low) / 2) + ($low - 1);
$two = $one + 1;
$three = $two + 1;

SELECT *
FROM comics
WHERE comicId IN ($low, $high, $one, $two, $three);

The reason why $low should be anything is that you could update low here and there to make the "old" comic be... well.. less old (if that makes sense). So instead of starting at 0 (first comic ever) you could start at 50, 100, 1000, blah. :)



Ok So now since there is this piece of information (That not all the id's exist (0-1600) and some of them are not relevant).

Remember this is not a final solution, i am just making up one. There are plenty of options to take when programming. Keep in mind efficiencies (IF NEEDED).

1: Create some sort of link table, call it whatever, [relevantcomics] with 2 fields, the id of the comics that are desired, and an autoincrementing field.

2: DO somewhat of the same logic as above except modify accordingly.

$low = 0; //this could be anything. 
$high = count;
$one = (($high - $low) / 2) + ($low - 1);
$two = $one + 1;
$three = $two + 1;

SELECT C.*
FROM comics AS C
    JOIN relevantcomics AS RC
      ON RC.id = C.comicid
WHERE RC.autoId IN ($low, $high, $one, $two, $three);

As long as the comics are inserted in proper ordering, this should work for you! Why this works is that the auto field is then just put into a separate table then retrieved and joined from there. This way your existing data does not have to be altered, except for when inserting new comics, the relevant table has to be updated as well.

share|improve this answer
    
No, the ID's aren't auto-increment. Or rather they are, but pages get deleted sometimes too, and there are other pages from other comics in that table too, which are not relevant. – Vilx- Jul 18 '11 at 23:09
    
The answer by @Jason would be the best route to go. Create a foreign key table to retrieve the correct comics. Ill update my answer with an "answer" (it could still be done differently) – Michael Jul 20 '11 at 14:49
    
So i updated my answer @Vilx – Michael Jul 20 '11 at 15:12

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