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I have a custom script in Xcode which returns an error, but suppose I don't care. Xcode doesn't care about /dev/null and won't compile

sdef "$INPUT_FILE_PATH" | sdp -fh -o "$DERIVED_FILES_DIR" 
--basename "$INPUT_FILE_BASE" 
--bundleid `defaults read "$INPUT_FILE_PATH/Contents/Info" CFBundleIdentifier`

It's basically for generating a .h file based on Apple Script Definitions, and it went all fine up until a recent OS X update.

In the terminal, all I have to so is end this command with

2>/dev/null 

and no error is returned. Whatever I try with 2> or just > or even &> doesn't work in Xcode, it will always return me an error.

/bin/sh -c "sdef \"$INPUT_FILE_PATH\" | sdp -fh -o \"$DERIVED_FILES_DIR\" 
--basename \"$INPUT_FILE_BASE\" --bundleid `defaults read
\"$INPUT_FILE_PATH/Contents/Info\" CFBundleIdentifier` 2> /dev/null"

Command /bin/sh failed with exit code 1
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FYI, it doesn't solve the real problem, but I decided to fix the code of the "bad definition" file, by doing this: sdef ... | sed 's/<contents name="contents"/<contents name="contents" code="ctnt"/g' | sep ... so I'm basically doing a search and replace which makes "sdef | sdp" not returning an error anymore... –  StuFF mc Jul 18 '11 at 22:35

1 Answer 1

Appending 2>/dev/null does not prevent the error status being returned by the sdef command, it just hides the error message.

Replace it with

|| echo "Failed".

If the sdef fails, the second part of the command is exited, and the echo should not report a bad status.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope. That won't help, because in this case, no output files (here $(DERIVED_FILES_DIR)/$(INPUT_FILE_BASE).h) would be generated, and thus the compiler will break later in my project. But that's a good tip anyways. –  StuFF mc Jul 19 '11 at 8:05

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