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Here is a quick snippet of my code to parse PDB files for molecular dynamics simulations:

Structure *s = new Structure(pdb_filename);
Chain     *c = new Chain();

while( ... read file ... ) {
    if ( ... new chain ... ) {
        Chain *c = new Chain();
        s->add_child(c);        // Add reference to a vector to 
                                // save the Chain for later
    }
}

When the containing function is called, the code acts as normal and gives brand new Structure and Chain objects as in the first two lines of the snippet.

When the criteria for a new chain is met again while looping over the file, the code returns the same Chain pointer to the object as before.

Will g++ give the same pointer over and over? Is there any way to get around this? If I add the c pointer to the 's' children vector, I assume calling delete c will cause even larger headaches?

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1  
I think you'd be insane to use raw pointers in this scenario. This looks like the ideal place to use smart pointers (shared_ptr or unique_ptr) and never worry about memory again. –  Kerrek SB Jul 18 '11 at 22:57
    
@Kerrek - any usage of pointers is an ideal place to use smart pointers. –  littleadv Jul 19 '11 at 1:26
    
@littledave: Hehe, good point :-) –  Kerrek SB Jul 19 '11 at 1:31

3 Answers 3

Structure *s = new Structure(pdb_filename);
Chain     *c = new Chain();

You just defined c here

while( ... read file ... ) {
    if ( ... new chain ... ) {
        Chain *c = new Chain();

You just defined c here again shadowing the other one.

When the criteria for a new chain is met again while looping over the file, the code returns the same Chain pointer to the object as before.

Now which one of the two you're looking at?

I think you can see the problem already.

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Ah, that worked perfectly. Any insight why g++ would allow me to compile this since it usually complains when a variable is declared more than once? –  Mike Jul 18 '11 at 22:20
2  
@Mike: Because it's not an error. The two cs are in different scopes. –  user802003 Jul 18 '11 at 22:23
1  
@Mike -Wshadow is a GCC warning that you can activate for such cases. But since it is not an error, I would not recommend doing so. –  Luc Danton Jul 18 '11 at 22:34
1  
I would argue the opposite. Compiling with the highest warning level is helpful in finding (and preventing) such common mistakes. Of course it is legal, and there may be reasons to hide variables within an outer scope, but usually this is not the desired behavior. –  Chad Jul 19 '11 at 0:20

the code returns the same Chain pointer to the object as before

That is hard to believe.

Will g++ give the same pointer over and over?

No. Each time you call new Chain it's a different Chain. It's a different pointer, pointing to different memory (that's why it's new). It's also shadowing the c before the while.

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Hard to believe, indeed! –  bitmask Jul 18 '11 at 22:14

new Chain() should give a different pointer each time

I think I may have an inkling what your problem is--

The c within your loop does not refer to the same variable as the c outside your loop. The c outside your loop will retain its same value all the way through.

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