Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently running cygwin on a target windows (server 2k3) machine to fire off a shell script that, among other things, creates a bunch of files on disc. However after the files are created I no longer have permissions to manipulate them through windows.

When the files are created the owner is getting set to 'SYSTEM' and the permissions for Administrators/Creator Group/Creator Owner/system are set to only 'special permissions' and nothing else. The permissions for Everyone and Users have read & execute, list folder contents and read.

My problem is that I cannot delete/modify the files now through windows. I would prefer to have something built into my scripts (either the shell script or something to call in cygwin) that would allow Administrators full control on the folder and all contents.

My current workaround has been to either do file modifications through cygwin but this is not preferable. I have also used setfacl -r -m default:other:rwx to add write permissions for the 'Users' group but it doesn't appear to have a recursive option and still doesn't give 'full control'

Is there a better way to use setfacl? Can I call the shell script using different/elevated permissions?

Thanks in advance.

results of getfacl on a newly created directory:

$ getfacl Directory/
# file: Directory/
# owner: SYSTEM
# group: root
user::rwx
group::r-x
group:Users:rwx
mask:rwx
other:r-x
default:user::rwx
default:group::r-x
default:group:Users:rwx
default:mask:rwx
default:other:r-x
share|improve this question
    
find /cygdrive/c/Users -exec setfacl -r -m default:other:rwx {} \; to emulate a 'recursive' mode to setfacl –  mob Jul 19 '11 at 0:04
    
I'd love an explanation as to how to just use the standard permissions that would have been used if the file were created outside of Cygwin. –  mlissner Dec 7 '11 at 19:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can try setting umask:

umask u=rwx,g=rwx,o=rwx

That should give user, group, and other read/write/execute on any newly created dirs.

If you only want the modified umask permanently, you can add it to your .bash_profile


Edit - Added example of mkdir before/after umask.

Here's the output of getfacl on a directory created before I set umask:

[/cygdrive/c/Documents and Settings/NOYB/Desktop]
==> getfacl test_wo_umask/
# file: test_wo_umask/
# owner: NOYB
# group: Domain Users
user::rwx
group::r-x
group:root:rwx
group:SYSTEM:rwx
mask:rwx
other:r-x
default:user::rwx
default:user:NOYB:rwx
default:group::r-x
default:group:root:rwx
default:group:SYSTEM:rwx
default:mask:rwx
default:other:r-x

Here's the output of getfacl on a directory created after I set umask:

[/cygdrive/c/Documents and Settings/NOYB/Desktop]
==> getfacl test_w_umask/
# file: test_w_umask/
# owner: NOYB
# group: Domain Users
user::rwx
group::rwx
group:root:rwx
group:SYSTEM:rwx
mask:rwx
other:rwx
default:user::rwx
default:user:NOYB:rwx
default:group::rwx
default:group:root:rwx
default:group:SYSTEM:rwx
default:mask:rwx
default:other:rwx
share|improve this answer
    
Worked great! fyi - I was using a combination of cp and mkrdir statements to create the final structure. After setting umask before calling my script it gave full control to Administrators as well as System which is enough for my purposes. –  chrisst Jul 19 '11 at 0:13
    
Excellent! Glad it worked for you. –  Daniel Haley Jul 19 '11 at 0:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.