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I keep running into a problem with multiple ajax requests that I tend to send to fetch data to refresh different components of a webpage. I always use my custom ajax functions(shared below) to do the ajax calls. And I find that the requests at times collides. I also make sure that the requests are sent in intervals of two seconds hoping that it serializes the way I send requests. Still I find that it does collide at times. What Am I doing wrong? Or rather, what changes can I do to my functions to make it work seamlessly, everytime?

Functions :

function get_xmlhttp_obj()
{
    try
    {
        // Firefox, Opera 8.0+, Safari
        xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    catch (e)
    {
        // Internet Explorer
        try
        {
            xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Msxml2.XMLHTTP");
        }
        catch (e) 
        {
            try
            {
                xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
            }
            catch (e)
            {
                alert(invalidbrowser);
            }
        }
    }
    return xmlHttp;
}

function passUrl(url1)
{    
    url1 = url1+"&sid="+Math.random();
    xmlHttp=get_xmlhttp_obj();
    xmlHttp.onreadystatechange = function() { stateChanged(xmlHttp); }; 
    xmlHttp.open("GET", url1, true);
    xmlHttp.send(null); 
}


function passposturl(url1,params)
{
    xmlHttp=get_xmlhttp_obj();
    xmlHttp.open("POST", url1, true);
    xmlHttp.setRequestHeader("Content-type", "application/x-www-form-urlencoded");
    xmlHttp.setRequestHeader("Content-length", params.length);
    xmlHttp.setRequestHeader("Connection", "close");
    xmlHttp.onreadystatechange =  function() { stateChanged(xmlHttp); };        
    xml Http.send(params);  
}

function stateChanged(xmlHttp) 
{
    if (xmlHttp.readyState == 1 || xmlHttp.readyState == 2 || xmlHttp.readyState == 3 || xmlHttp.readyState == 0) 
    {
         // Wait state. I load loading text or image here
    }
    else if(xmlHttp.readyState == 4)
    {
         // catch the response and display in the specific container.
         if(loadflag=="global_live_xjournal_feed")
         {
           document.getElementById("global_live_xjournal_feed").innerHTML=xmlHttp.responseText;
           setTimeout("call_refresh_global_xjournal_feed", 5000);
         }
    }
} 


function call_refresh_global_xjournal_feed(obj)
{
    if(obj=="global_xjournal_feed")
    {
         var url = "ajax_activity_feed.php?id="+obj;
         passUrl(url);
         loadflag="global_live_xjournal_feed";
}
}
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1  
Either check if there is an outstanding request before sending another, or include a sequence number in your responses so you can discard those older than the most recently received. –  Dan Grossman Jul 19 '11 at 0:09
    
Thanks Dan. How do I check if there is an outstanding request before sending another? Discarding is not an option I can use, because I am not sending multiple requests to do the same thing. For example, lets say I have a session police function that will check for an empty session, and will redirect the user to the login page when the session is empty. This function is called every 2 seconds. And there is a live activity feed, that gets refreshed every 5 seconds. The odd's that these two are going to collide is pretty large. And both the responses are important to me. –  sniper Jul 19 '11 at 0:13

3 Answers 3

If you want to ensure your async calls are being performed in a serial fashion you can always use a recursive asynchronous call that has a setTimeout() in the callback. So for example:

function DoSomething() {
   $.get('/ajax/call', function() {
      //do whatever
      setTimeout(DoSomething, 2000);
   }
}

In this example I'm using a jQuery example but you could easily switch your function out with $.get().

This way you will never start another asynchronous call until the first one has completed. It might be a bit longer than 2 seconds, but everything will run in serial.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey Kyle, that sure will work if I am going to continuously refresh a component. What if I want to continuously refresh multiple components, at the same frequency, or a frequency in which the requests may overlap from time to time? I have quoted an example in the comment above, to Dan's comment on my question. –  sniper Jul 19 '11 at 0:19
    
I would just create a unique function for each tasks. That way they will only be responsible for calling themself and since the async requests will be unique it will not be possible to collide. –  Kyle Rogers Jul 19 '11 at 0:21
    
Ahh, let me try to understand this. If I use two functions at the same frequency(setTimeout(dosomething1, 2000), setTimeout(dosomething2,2000)) and call them both at the same time(body onload), wont their requests collide at all? I understand that dosomething1's request will never collide with another dosomething1's request(same with dosomething2). But what about dosomething1's request/response and dosomething2's request/response? –  sniper Jul 19 '11 at 0:26
    
That is correct. –  Kyle Rogers Jul 19 '11 at 1:05

The way you have your code, each request is using a different xmlHttp object. There is no collision as each object will have it's own separate state. When processing the results, you just have to not assume any global state. As long as all you're looking at is the state in the particular xmlHttp object that has been called in order to know what to do, you should be fine. If both requests finish at the exact same moment, one will get into the JS queue before the other, it will run it's statechange function to completion and then the second one will get it's statechange notification.

For asynchronous calls like this, there is usually zero reason to spread them out unless you need the results of the first before firing the second. In fact, you get better end-to-end performance if you start both requests right away and then just wait for them both to complete. Whichever one completes first, you will get it's statechange callback and then the second one will come in after that.

FYI, if you are debugging with breakpoints or looking at debug console output, you will have to pay strict attention to which xmlHttp object is which when interpreting the output since different stages of their progress may be interleaved.

share|improve this answer
    
That was pretty informative. I had changed my functions a few months to create separate objects for each call, hoping that it would fix it. The clashing has significantly reduced, but is still present at odd times. So you say, the way I am doing it, requests/responses shouldnt be clashing? I dont use a debug console at all. How do I check this in the js code itself? But I am pretty certain that stateChanged will only see whichever xmlhttp object that its been passed :) –  sniper Jul 19 '11 at 0:51
    
What do you mean by a clash? What actually happens when you have a clash? You don't show us the actual code that processes the responses - that is likely where any problem would be. In your stateChanged function, you would have to be able to differentiate between the two xmlHttp objects or between the two responses in order to know which was which. –  jfriend00 Jul 19 '11 at 0:53
    
Here is what I generally do to process responses : Lets say I have function A which will send the requests to test.php. I also set a "loadflag" which is a global variable, that indicates that its a request from function A, and this "loadflag" is checked inside statechanged so that statechanged will know which container to load the response in. I have updated the question with that code snippet as well. –  sniper Jul 19 '11 at 0:58
1  
That's where the clash comes from. You can't do it that way if both requests are ever going at the same time. You can put that flag on the appropriate xmlHttp request object and check it on that object in your stateChanged() function. Then, each xmlHttp object has it's own state so the two will never get confused. This is the advantage of object oriented programming rather than using global state variables. –  jfriend00 Jul 19 '11 at 1:03
    
FYI, using an ajax library makes all of this a lot easier (jQuery, YUI, etc...). You could also give each of your two requests different stateChanged functions and then you would have different code for each response so there would be no possibility of mixing them up (though this is not required if you keep track of which is which in the xmlHttp object). –  jfriend00 Jul 19 '11 at 1:06

My AJAX library would assist with this in two posible ways:

1) The library allows multiple calls to be "packaged" into into a single request such that a handler is only called when ALL of the calls are completed.

2) The other is to create a request pool with a single caller (HTTP object). Normally pools would have multiple callers (allowing multiple simultaneous requests) - but limiting this to a single caller would force any requests queued to that pool to be run in serial.

I've found the library very useful in my work, it can be found here:

http://depressedpress.com/javascript-extensions/dp_ajax/

Hope this helps.

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