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I am trying to find the time taken to run a function. I am doing it this way:

SomeFunc(input) {
    Stopwatch stopWatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopWatch.Start();

    //some operation on input          

    stopWatch.Stop();

    long timeTaken = stopWatch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
}

Now the "some operation on input" as mentioned in the comments takes significant time based on the input to SomeFunc.

The problem is when I call SomeFunc multiple times from the main, I get timeTaken correctly only for the first time, and the rest of the time it is being assigned to 0. Is there a problem with the above code?

EDIT: There is a UI with multiple text fields, and when a button is clicked, it is delegated to the SomeFunc. The SomeFunc makes some calculations based on the input (from the text fields) and displays the result on the UI. I am not allowed to share the code in "some operation on input" since I have signed an NDA. I can however answer your questions as to what I am trying to achieve there. Please help.

EDIT 2: As it seems that I am getting weird value when the function is called the first time, and as @Mike Bantegui mentioned, there must be JIT optimization going on, the only solution I can think of now (to not get zero as execution time) is that to display the time in nano seconds. How is it possible to display the time in nano seconds in C#?

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1  
Is it possible that the code is being optimized out by the JIT compiler on multiple passes? Alternatively, is any caching of results happening that your code is taking less time on further passes? Please post more of the "some operation on input" as this could be highly dependent on what that operation is. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 19 '11 at 0:54
    
There is a UI with multiple text fields, and when a button is clicked, it is delegated to the SomeFunc. The SomeFunc makes some calculations based on the input (from the text fields) and displays the result on the UI. I am not allowed to share the code in "some operation on input" since I have signed an NDA. I can however answer your questions as to what I am trying to achieve there. Please help. –  Shankar Jul 19 '11 at 0:58
    
You don't have to give the operation exactly. Use abstract names and terms. As long as you abstract the description enough, nothing is violated. On another note, @Jalal's and Rig's answer both hit two very important topics. One is that you need to take a large sampling of data, and the other is that you should actually use that data in some way (Like outputting it to a file). Otherwise, you may run into sampling artifacts or issues with the JIT compiler optimizing things away. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 19 '11 at 1:01
    
Thanks @Mike Bantegui for the hint –  Shankar Jul 19 '11 at 1:09
1  
I've put up a question asking how to properly benchmark code (stackoverflow.com/questions/6741393/…;. Hopefully that question will have some good answers on how to write a proper benchmark. With that, you may be able to solve this issue you're having. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 19 '11 at 1:39

3 Answers 3

In fact you are getting the wrong time at the first start and correct time to the remaining. You can't relay just on the first call to measure the time. However It seams to be that the operation is too fast and so you get the 0 results. To measure the test correctly call the function 1000 times for example to see the average cost time:

Stopwatch watch = StopWatch.StartNew();
for (int index = 0; index < 1000; index++)
{
    SomeFunc(input);
}
watch.Stop();
Console.WriteLine(watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

Edit:

How is it possible to display the time in nano seconds

You can get watch.ElapsedTicks and then convert it to nanoseconds : (watch.ElapsedTicks / Stopwatch.Frequency) * 1000000000

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thanks much. I am getting different results for very large input. As @Mike Bantegui mentioned, probably the JIT is doing optimization, but why is that for the first time (in each run) I am getting some random (large) value as execution time? –  Shankar Jul 19 '11 at 1:07
    
@Shankar: You are welcome, To be honest, I don't know why exactly this is happening, but I know it by practice. But I can guess that It maybe due to optimization code will not take place until the first run.. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 19 '11 at 1:11
    
@Shankar: If that is the case I suggest you to ignore the first call to SomeFunc(input), so call it once before the test and then run the test. –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 19 '11 at 1:14

Well, you aren't outputing that data anywhere. Ideally you would do it something more like this.

void SomeFunc(input)
{
  Do sstuff
}

main()
{
  List<long> results = new List<long>();
  Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
  for(int i = 0; i < MAX_TRIES; i++)
  {
     sw.Start();
     SomeFunc(arg);
     sw.Stop();
     results.Add(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
     sw.Reset();
  }

  //Perform analyses and results
}
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What is the difference in doing it the way you mentioned and the way I am trying to achieve it? –  Shankar Jul 19 '11 at 1:01
    
@Shankar: In principle there really isn't any difference. @Rig is actually just building up a list of all the timings, but we don't know if that's what you're doing in your code too. No where do we see you actually using the result of timeTaken. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 19 '11 at 1:04
    
One, I am able to run statistics on the results of N number of calls to the function to see what happens over multiple uses. Build up a min/max/avg. Two, unless you are presumable missing some parts of your idea you aren't doing anything with the result. You need to return it or do something with it. –  Rig Jul 19 '11 at 1:06
    
@Mike, you are totally right. It really depends. The last time I did something like this my method was more appropriate as I was looking to see certain behaviors on JIT and caching. So who knows, another method may be more appropriate but we would need more details. –  Rig Jul 19 '11 at 1:08
    
I understand, and I tried it this way. For the first time I am getting a large amount of time as execution time and for the rest, I am getting accurate time. Why is it happening that way the first time? –  Shankar Jul 19 '11 at 1:08

As a simple example, consider the following (contrived) example:

double Mean(List<double> items)
{
    double mu = 0;
    foreach (double val in items)
        mu += val;
    return mu / items.Length;
}

We can time it like so:

void DoTimings(int n)
{
    Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
    int time = 0;
    double dummy = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        List<double> items = new List<double>();
        // populate items with random numbers, excluded for brevity

        sw.Start();
        dummy += Mean(items);
        sw.Stop();
        time += sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    }

    Console.WriteLine(dummy);
    Console.WriteLine(time / n);
}

This works if the list of items is actually very large. But if it's too small, we'll have to do multiple runs under one timing:

void DoTimings(int n)
{
    Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
    int time = 0;
    double dummy = 0;

    List<double> items = new List<double>(); // Reuse same list
    // populate items with random numbers, excluded for brevity

    sw.Start();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        dummy += Mean(items);
        time += sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    }
    sw.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine(dummy);
    Console.WriteLine(time / n);
}

In the second example, if the size of the list is too small, then we can accurately get an idea of how long it takes by simply running this for a large enough n. Each has it's advantages and flaws though.

However, before doing either of these I would do a "warm up" calculation before hand:

// Or something smaller, just enough to let the compiler JIT
double dummy = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) 
    dummy += Mean(data);
Console.WriteLine(dummy);

// Now do the actual timing

An alternative method of both would be to do what @Rig did in his answer, and build up a list of results to do statistics on. In the first case, you'd simply build up a list of each individual time. In the second case, you would build up a list of the average timing of multiple runs, since the time for a calculation could smaller than finest grained time in your Stopwatch.

With all that said, I would say there is one very large caveat in all of this: Calculating the time it takes for something to run is very hard to do properly. It's admirable to want to do profiling, but you should do some research on SO and see what other people have done to do this properly. It's very easy to write a routine that times something badly, but very hard to do it right.

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